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HindustanTimes Wed,22 Oct 2014

Kids Zone

Physically active kids do well in studies

ANI
Washington, January 03, 2012
First Published: 13:39 IST(3/1/2012)
Last Updated: 16:15 IST(3/1/2012)

Leading a physically active lifestyle may improve academic performance in children, a new study involving an Indian origin scientist suggests.

Amika Singh, Ph.D., of the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues reviewed evidence about the relationship between physical activity and academic performance because of concerns that pressure to improve test scores may often mean more instructional time for classroom subjects with less time for physical activity.

The researchers identified 10 observational and four interventional studies for review.

Twelve of the studies were conducted in the United States, plus one in Canada and one in South Africa. Sample sizes ranged from 53 to about 12,000 participants between the ages of 6 years and 18 years. Follow-up varied from eight weeks to more than five years.

“According to the best-evidence synthesis, we found strong evidence of a significant positive relationship between physical activity and academic performance,” the researchers said.

“The findings of one high-quality intervention study and one high-quality observational study suggest that being more physically active is positively related to improved academic performance in children,” they stated.

They suggest that exercise may help cognition by increasing blood and oxygen flow to the brain, increasing levels of norepinephrine and endorphins to decrease stress and improve mood, and increasing growth factors that help create new nerve cells and support synaptic plasticity.

“More high-quality studies are needed on the dose-response relationship between physical activity and academic performance and on the explanatory mechanisms, using reliable and valid measurement instruments to assess this relationship accurately,” they concluded.

The study was reported in the January issue of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.


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