Advertisement

HindustanTimes Sun,13 Jul 2014

More than 15,000 attend Malhar as fest draws to a close

Sanchayan Bhattacharjee, Hindustan Times  Mumbai, August 20, 2012
First Published: 00:38 IST(20/8/2012) | Last Updated: 00:38 IST(20/8/2012)

Malhar, the annual festival of St Xavier’s College and one of biggest college festivals in the city ended on a high note on Sunday with a power-packed dance event offering tribute to Bollywood. The event called ‘Ticket to Bollywood’ drew maximum audience on the final day of the three-day affair.

Advertisement

“I have seen almost 20 different Malhar festivals and each year brings something unique. The students learn to handle responsibility and make quick yet sensible decisions  preparing for the festival,” said Radha Kumar, a teacher.

More than 15,000 students attended Malhar this year. “It is incredible that college students manage to organise a festival of this magnitude. Every person involved in the organising committee learns from the process,” said actor Amrita Rao, who judged one of the events.

The day saw a mix of events such as ‘Illuminati’, a story-telling event wherein the auditorium lights were put off and participants had to use painted props and music to narrate their stories.

Similarly ‘Jashn-e-Qawwali’, introduced at Malhar this year expected each team of singers to perform an authentic ‘Qawwali’ song without the use of any electronic music instruments.

Bob Marley songs were the focus of the ‘Acapella’ event as groups presented reggae music using a vocal background score with humming and beat boxing.

‘Show me the Funny’ challenged participants to orchestrate an impromptu funny conversation between characters such as Popeye, Chandler, Shaktimaan, etc. while responding to sudden judge calls that asked them to hallucinate, cry or die between the performances.

“It is important to be quick and witty simultaneously. Even the lamest joke can make people laugh if it is presented well,” said Akshay Joshi, 22, one of the participants.

Malhar includes a workforce of more than a 1,000 students. “It is impossible to directly oversee everything. The success of the festival hinges on the recruitment of the core committee. Even if one of them is not up to the mark, the festival suffers considerably,” said Aadi Vaidya, 20, chairperson of Malhar.


Advertisement
more from Mumbai

Book sketches many shades of Bal Thackeray

A complex, nuanced portrait of Thackeray emerged during a panel discussion around Hindustan Times political editor (west), Sujata Anandan’s book, at the NCPA. The book profiles the rise of the Sena in the city and the life and times of its leader.
Advertisement
Most Popular
Advertisement
Advertisement
Copyright © 2014 HT Media Limited. All Rights Reserved