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HindustanTimes Thu,18 Sep 2014

Confused over choice of subjects? DU is here to clear all doubts

Mallica Joshi, Hindustan Times  New Delhi, February 20, 2011
First Published: 00:40 IST(20/2/2011) | Last Updated: 00:42 IST(20/2/2011)

For Sumit Chaudhary, even a score of 86% in his Class 12 board examinations could not secure him an admission in Delhi University in a course he wanted.

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A student of a Government Boys' School in Mehrauli, Chaudhary had opted for two vocational subjects - IT Systems and Business Data Processing - and wanted to pursue a course in BSc (Hons) Computer Science.

However, he could not, as the university does not allow students with more than one vocational subject to opt for honours courses.

Chaudhary, who is currently pursuing BA programme at Hindu College, still regrets opting for these subjects in school.

"Had I opted for subjects such as Physics or Economics, I would have been able to do what I wanted to," he said.

Many students, especially those from government schools, where vocational courses are being pushed in earnest, miss out on an opportunity to do the courses of their choice in good colleges despite having good percentages as they are not aware what subject combinations will be useful.

The Delhi University, on Saturday, organised a workshop - Transition 2011 - for teachers from Kendriya Vidyalayas and student counsellors from the Directorate of Education, where confusions on course content and feasible course combinations were cleared.


"Why are students pushed into vocational course if the university is not ready to recognise most of them? This is unfair to students who miss out on opportunities," said a counsellor from a government school in RK Puram.

According to university rules, students who have opted for two vocational subjects can either apply for BA and BCom or for vocational courses only. Those with one vocational subject can apply for honours courses only if the vocational subject is related to the subject they want to study.

"This kind of an exercise is important so that teachers can guide students correctly regarding the subject combinations they opt for after class 10. If a student wants to study BSc Biochemistry it is necessary that he/she has maths as a subject in classes 11 and 12. Many students don't know this and are unable to do what they want to," said Gurpreet Singh Tuteja, deputy dean, students' welfare, Delhi University. More than 100 teachers and counsellors attended the workshop that was held in two sessions.


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