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HindustanTimes Fri,18 Apr 2014

Najeeb Jung is new vice chancellor of Jamia Millia

HT Correspondent, Hindustan Times  New Delhi, September 03, 2009
First Published: 00:42 IST(3/9/2009) | Last Updated: 00:44 IST(3/9/2009)
Ex-civil servant Najeeb Jung has been appointed as the new vice-chancellor of Jamia Millia Islamia university.

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He is likely to join work from Thursday.

Jung—an internationally known expert on energy—will take over from incumbent Mushirul Hasan, who was also one of the three names short-listed for the post.

The third contender was serving IAS officer Afzal Amanullah, who is principal secretary, home, in Bihar.

Jung studied at St. Stephen's college, Delhi and the London School of Economics, London, before joining the IAS in 1973 batch. 

According to sources, the HRD ministry had already decided not to give another term to Hasan, since a large section of political heavyweights led by a central minister from UP had lobbied against a second term for Hasan.

Though HRD minister Kapil Sibal had supported Hasan's case, he is said to have relented to pressure from the Congress.

Jung quit the service after his stint as joint secretary (exploration) in the petroleum ministry.

Jung played a crucial role in the privatization of ONGC's Panna-Mukta oilfield that went to a consortium of Reliance-ONGC and British Gas.

Jung also had a stint in the Asian Development Bank. Later, he became director, energy research, in Reliance-run Observer Research Foundation. Jung is currently pursuing his PhD on energy economics from Oxford University.

Notably, at least 28 MPs had signed a letter requesting the President of India to ensure that Hasan was not reappointed the university head. The MPs, from across both Houses of Parliament, had talked about corruption allegations against Hasan and demanded an enquiry.

Hasan had been courting controversy for some time now. He had earlier opposed the conversion of Jamia into a minority educational institution, thus earning the ire of many Muslim leaders. However, a section of the academic community hailed his secular thoughts.

But his tenure as vice chancellor has seen repeated allegations of corruption, siphoning off money and nepotism.

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