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HindustanTimes Mon,29 Dec 2014

Speeding heavy commercial vehicles add to death count

Jatin Anand , Hindustan Times  New Delhi, January 13, 2011
First Published: 01:05 IST(13/1/2011) | Last Updated: 01:07 IST(13/1/2011)

Disastrous design of the flyovers accompanied by speeding commercial vehicles have made road accidents a norm in the Punjabi Bagh traffic circle. The presence of a busy bus depot near the two flyovers adds to the traffic woes.

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The total number of fatal road accidents reported in the Capital may have gone down, but commercial vehicles ferrying passengers have been responsible for as many as 10% of the total road accidents reported in 2010.

“Passenger carriers, both state-owned and others, have been responsible for as many as 196 fatal road accidents in 2010. Their involvement has come down from 243 cases reported in 2009 due to stricter enforcement of traffic norms,” maintained Satyendra Garg, joint commissioner of police (traffic). However, a close analysis of the data reveal that passenger carriers remain errant vehicles in more or less the same percentage of fatal road accident cases despite the drop in the total number of such cases to have been reported.

“While passenger carriers were responsible for about 10.5% of the total number of fatal road accidents that were reported in 2009, they remained errant vehicle drivers in 9.3% of the cases in 2010. This means that more needs to be done as far as curbing dangerous and reckless driving by them is concerned,” said a senior traffic police officer, requesting anonymity.

To recall just a fraction of such incidents, a major accident on November 22, 2010, saw as many as 26 people getting injured when an speeding Blueline bus collided with a Metro pillar and turned turtle in west Delhi’s Mundka area. Similarly, 35 people, who were on their way to Rajasthan for a pilgrimage, were injured when the chartered bus they were travelling in turned turtle in Yamuna Vihar’s D-block on August 30, 2010.

According to data available with the traffic police, Blueline buses were behind the maximum number of fatalities that is 82, on Delhi roads followed by Delhi Transport Corporation (DTC) buses which were found responsible in 49 cases in 2010 as compared to 57 in 2009.

“Minibuses have been behind 22 fatal road accidents in 2010 as compared to 32 in the previous year. The most worrying trend, however, has come across in the case of chartered buses which have been found to be behind 43 cases last year as compared to 31 cases that were reported in 2009,” the officer said.


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