iconimg Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Mallica Joshi, Hindustan Times
New Delhi, July 04, 2013
Officials of Delhi University on Wednesday admitted that many colleges were flouting norms and refusing admission to students, who meet the cut-off, even as a bunch of aspirants, who had got a raw deal, continued to run from pillar to post to secure a seat. The incident, somewhat dramatic, refers to the College of Vocational Studies, which on the second day of admission itself claimed that they had run out of forms for its course in English.

The college asked the applicants to come back the next day. However, the next day the college authorities denied admission to the bunch of students, stating that they had admitted more than the sanctioned strength. Applicants have been running from pillar to post since then to secure their admission.

See DU's third cut-off list here

A similar scene later unfolded at the Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College, where applicants were denied admission in the computer science course.

At Sri Aurobindo College, applicants from the Haryana Board were denied admission as they did not have their original marksheets.

This, despite the fact, that the university had issued strict guidelines to colleges, asking them to give provisional admission to students who did not have their original mark sheets.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2013/7/04-07-pg4d.jpg

“I submitted my provisional marksheet at Sri Aurobindo College but they refused to accept it. After several appeals, the convener signed my form on Tuesday. When I came to pay the fee on Wednesday, I was told that my application had been rejected again. My name appeared in both the first and the second cut-off lists but I have been told to wait for another day,” said Pooja Singh, who has scored 83% and is a student of Gyandeep School, Sonepat.  

What was more frustrating were the university’s claims that the colleges were not paying heed to its orders.

Hindustan Times contacted a number of senior DU officials, all of whom claimed that the college principals were not adhering to norms. They, however, expressed helplessness to do anything about the situation right away.

The dean of colleges said he had issued guidelines to the office of the dean, students’ welfare. Meanwhile, the deputy dean, students’ welfare, South Campus, said that he had issued several orders to the colleges to admit applicants, but none of them had been heeded.