iconimg Monday, August 31, 2015

Nivedita Khandekar, Hindustan Times
New Delhi, February 02, 2014
Chhaya Gaur, 50, from Krishna Nagar, is sitting outside the Aam Aadmi Party’s (AAP’s) office along with her son, anxiety writ large on her face. The housewife, who claimed she had never ventured out alone, said one month of the AAP’s rule in Delhi inspired her to take a chance at contesting the Lok Sabha election.

She is not alone. Negative media publicity notwithstanding, Delhi’s aam aadmi has taken to the AAP in a big way after their spectacular debut in the recent Delhi assembly elections.

Apart from this housewife, there are people such as a small time businessman and even journalists who are among those queuing up at the AAP office to try their luck from one of the seven Lok Sabha seats in Delhi.

The Delhi unit of the AAP has received almost 1000-odd forms from Lok Sabha ticket aspirants.

The screening process started some six days ago and the screening committee for Delhi is meeting on an average 50-60 people per day.

When HT visited the AAP office at Patel Nagar on Saturday, Deoli resident Sanjay Kumar Jha, 41, a businessman, was waiting for his turn. Associated since day one of the AAP formation, he said: “I felt this is a party which can help in bringing about vyavastha parivartan (systemic change).”

What if he is not selected? “No issues, I will continue to work as party volunteer and spread awareness about de-centralisation of power,” he said.

Satish Kumar, 44, a Neb Sarai resident into real estate and building business, said he was associated since 2011 India Against Corruption days.

“I had not applied for Vidhan Sabha ticket, but have applied now because want to serve people through AAP for a corruption free fear-free India,” he said.   

Rajeev Nishaana, a journalist with a private news channel, came from Laxmi Nagar, justified his aspiration for Lok Sabha saying: “When it comes to making laws, it can be done only in the Parliament. I have been working for unemployed youth since 2000 and see it as an opportunity to further work from inside the Parliament.”

But why did he choose AAP? “Well, this seems to me the only party where anyone and everyone have a chance to at least make a case or be heard,” he said.