Create a timeline of your 24 hours with visual diary ‘Days’ | apps | Hindustan Times
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Create a timeline of your 24 hours with visual diary ‘Days’

A new iOS application aims to enable users to create a visual timeline of their day and share these images with friends, with the aim of making documenting one's life a habit.

apps Updated: May 07, 2013 11:11 IST

A new iOS application aims to enable users to create a visual timeline of their day and share these images with friends, with the aim of making documenting one's life a habit.


The new application called Days enables users to document their day with groups of photos that are time-stamped and grouped together in a 24-hour period, defined as 5am-5am in the user's local time zone. User's of Days can only share photos taken within the application and, rather than choosing which images to share, decide which images to remove.

The automatic time-stamping of the images prevents users from fabricating a day by combining images from several different occasions on different dates.

Users of Days can only post one set of photos once per day: these images can then be viewed by friends who are also on Days or via other social networks such as Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr, or via email.

Days was founded by Keenan Cummings and Jeremy Fisher and was originally Beta tested by around 100 users before hitting the iOS app store. The app requires iOS 6 to run and, in a feature on tech site, Mashable Fisher confirmed that the company will be designing the app for Google's hotly buzzed Glass headset.

In the same feature Fisher also explained that he hope the application would encourage the documentation of daily life as a matter of course, enabling people to see the world through the eyes of others.

While Days is pretty unique in the idea of creating a visual narrative of one's life, there are plenty of other photo-sharing applications that could be used to provide a snapshot of daily life on the market, like Instagram and Path. The latter, which encourages sharing of snapshots of one's life accompanied by a line or two of text, or a song the user is currently listening to, recently came under attack for controversial policies for finding friends on the app via one's Facebook account.