Art that tells the tales of hope, hardships, willpower and hard work

  • Etti Bali, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
  • Updated: Jul 06, 2016 18:48 IST
Clockwise from top to bottom: Amita Dutta, Shree Kant Dubey, Balbir Krishan, and a painting by Arveend Budh Singh.

Meet Delhi’s differently abled artists who have battled all odds and made Delhi’s art scene more soulful. These artists have not let their disabilities come in the way of their dreams, and proved that willpower is all you need to succeed in life.

Their work ranges from spiritual art to unique storytelling, but all of it conveys only one message that of not giving up in the face of adversity.

Read: Art with a cause: Kaanchi Chopra’s paintings aren’t just pretty

Amita Dutta

Amita is hearing and speech impaired, but that hasn’t stopped her from experimenting with new art styles. Her medium of choice is coffee, which is painted on plywood. Her mother-in-law handles all her correspondence and says, “Amita really likes painting nature and spirituality using coffee.”

Amita Dutta uses coffee to paint.

Amita is the recipient of the President’s Award in Women Entrepreneur Category for the year 2012. “It is not easy to tackle things when you have a disability. Amita worked hard towards her craft and has had shows at India International Trade Fair and at The Lalit which have given her tremendous exposure and encouragement,” she concludes.

Shree Kant Dubey

Shree Kant lost his right arm in an accident at the age of 14. Not losing hope, he went on to do a Masters in Fine Arts and has held numerous exhibitions all over India. “I wanted to join the army, but my right arm had to be amputated after an accident,” he says.

Shree Kant Dubey started painting with his left hand, after he lost his right arm in an accident.

Defining his style of painting as figurative art, he adds, “I present Indian mythology with a modern twist. My art is also presented in the book Sadguru Prabhu Yeshu Ki Mahagatha.” He found inspiration from artists like Satish Gujral, MF Husain and Picasso. He has had 22 solo shows and over 100 group shows across the country. He concludes with a message for budding artists, “Work hard and turn all the negatives into positives.”

Arveend Budh Singh

Arveend Budh Singh has polio and took to canvas to highlight social causes. “My work speaks for me. I paint mainly about women issues and social causes”, he says. Using oil and acrylic on canvas, Singh likes making vibrant art as colours make him happy. “I have held 14 exhibitions in Delhi, and got a lot of love and respect”, he adds. His message for aspiring artists “If god has not given us one thing, then he has given us something special. We need to find that talent and work hard to bring it to the core”.

Balbir Krishan

Balbir lost both his legs at the age of 21, but that didn’t deter him from pursuing a master’s degree as well as an M. Phil in Art History. He is also openly gay and says his art has been shaped by his personality. “My values never matched with those of my community back home. I also faced sexual harassment as a child. My art is a reflection of all that I had to go through”, he says.

Balbir Krishan loves vibrant art.

He describes his art as figurative and most of his learning was from books bought from Daryaganj’s Sunday book market. “My art will always have finishing touches of black. It is my signature style”, he adds. He is now residing in New York with his husband. “Respect yourself, and then only others will respect you. I lost both my legs, but won my life back,” he concludes.

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