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Bigger and better

Once again, the spotlight is on the annual Kala Ghoda cultural festival, which kicks off tomorrow. Its 11th year will focus on highlighting the environmental concerns and preserving peace. Reema Gehi writes

art and culture Updated: Feb 06, 2009 21:33 IST
Reema Gehi

Once again, the spotlight is on the annual Kala Ghoda cultural festival, which kicks off tomorrow. The slew of activities at the festival in its 11th year will focus on highlighting the environmental concerns and preserving peace.
Pallavi Sharma, a key member of the Kala Ghoda committee, says, “While the environment issues were understandable.. restoring peace in the city, post the despicable Mumbai attacks seemed like the need of the hour.”

Start to finish
The traditional heritage walk, which begins from the ‘circle of history’ through the former Royal Alfred Sailor's Home, Regal Cinema and that concludes at the Royal Institute of Science, will continue
to mark the commencement of the festival.

Each day at the week-long

festival, there will be a plethora of activities related to visual art, theatre, literature, films, music and dance across various venues within the vicinity — the National Gallery of Modern Art, Cama Hall, David Sassoon Library, Horniman Circle
Garden and Jehangir Art Gallery lane, which remains the heart of cultural happenings.

Several art workshops for children organised by Dhruvi Acharya, Arzan Khambatta and Rekha Shivdasani will also be part of the vast itinerary.

That apart, in the customary fashion, several gourmet spreads and handicraft stalls will be set up at the arena. “Yes, it’s that time of the year, when there is more art, food and souvenirs to enjoy on the streets than at galleries, restaurants and shops,” smiles Sharma.

Even the economic slowdown hasn’t caused any disturbance to the ambition of making the festival bigger and better with each year. Sharma asserts, “The festival is earmarked in everyone’s cultural calendar.. we wouldn’t compromise on the quality for anything.”

Given that it’s a prime public festival, the security, of course, remains the key concern. “However, the police force has been the most cooperative and has ensured full support,” assures Sharma.
The festival, spelling high buoyancy will conclude on February 15 with a musical evening by singer Shaan, at the Asiatic Library steps.