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Connecting to roots through art

The art scene is nowadays abuzz with a host of artists trying to connect to their roots through their paintings.

art and culture Updated: Jul 27, 2011 01:36 IST

The art scene is nowadays abuzz with a host of artists trying to connect to their roots through their paintings. “Watercolours evoke nostalgia and memories of simple living amid nature, and the innocence of youth,” says adman-turned-artist Rajat Bandopadhyay from New Delhi, who is going to showcase his solo exhibition of naturescapes in water colours in the Capital. “I remember working on three water colour compositions on an average every day when I was in college,” he adds.

Bandopadhyay looks for reflections of Bengal in the array of boats that he loves to paint on paper. For artist Sabyasachi Ghosh, who had an exhibition of his artwork in Delhi recently, Indian mythology and religion were ways to connect to his roots in India during his tenure in Riyadh where he worked as a school teacher. “I painted motifs from the Mahabharata, flying pigs, eagles, images of Lord Vishnu and the cosmic big bang,” Ghosh says.

While artist Manju Nath Kamath is trying to revive the art traditions of Bootha Kola and Yakshagana in native Mangalore, artist Niladri Paul, a native of Jharkhand, is haunted by a tribal avatar of Radha-Krishna in his art, which he links to the ancient musical, dance and theatrical traditions of India in his acrylic compositions.

The eagerness to connect to a lost homeland can also be seen in artist Vishal Dar’s media work, which depict the Kashmir conflict, corruption, suicides by army soldiers and intra-national identity. “The pain we feel gets translated into our work,” says Veer Munshi, an artist in exile from Kashmir.

Catch the show live
What: Relate, an art show
When: August 1 - August 10
Where: Triveni Kala Sangam, 205, Tansen Marg

Nearest Metro Station: Mandi House on the Blue Line