Delhi art show focuses on aspects of feminine grace and power | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Delhi art show focuses on aspects of feminine grace and power

Femininity has always been a marked area of interest, for artists across various media. So an exhibition, in town, that highlights the different avatars of a woman does not come as a surprise.

art and culture Updated: Nov 28, 2013 11:44 IST
Aakriti Sawhney

Femininity has always been a marked area of interest, for artists across various media. So an exhibition, in town, that highlights the different avatars of a woman does not come as a surprise. But what surely does surprise, are the diverse questions that the exhibition so subtly addresses, through a range of impressive artworks.





"The declining respect for women in today’s world has inspired us to host this show. It highlights the ‘Devi’ in every woman," says Shobha Bhatia, director, Gallerie Ganesha and the curator of the show. She adds, "The paradox of being a woman in our country today is that, on one hand, she is worshiped as a Goddess and, at the same time, she also gets killed in the womb. It is a constant struggle for us, as a society, to find a middle ground between these two extremes."



http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/popup/2013/11/Catch_it_Live.jpgTitled Feminine Divine, the ongoing show at Shridharani Gallery, Triveni Kala Sangam focuses on all that is symbolic of feminine grace and power. With an impressive line up of artists, which includes Arpana Caur, Ganesh Pyne, Jayasri Burman, KS Kulkarni, Laxma Goud, Neekant Choudhary, Paresh Maity and Satish Gujral, among others, the show highlights and reflects on the multiple roles of a woman as jagat janani, shakti, ardhangini, annapurna and naayika.



Artist Arpana Caur, commenting on her work titled Sohni, says, "Sohni was a woman born 500 years ago and her legend still lives on. For me, Sohni is symbolic of conviction, human courage and love. She gave up her life for her values and I believe there is a Sohni in all of us."



Another highlight of the exhibition is artist Jayasri Burman’s work titled Annapurna. Made with watercolour, pen and ink on paper, the work portrays women as caregivers and the one who feeds the stomach. "One cannot do without food. A woman is an Annapurna, someone who makes sure every stomach in her family is fed and no one goes hungry in her family, and hence society at large. Through this work, I have created an enduring image of a woman as a nurturer, an image which will remain relevant forever however advanced our civil societies may become," says Jayasri Burman.