Eid Mubarak: Here’s everything you need to know about Eid-al-Fitr or Meethi Eid | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Eid Mubarak: Here’s everything you need to know about Eid-al-Fitr or Meethi Eid

Eid-al-Fitr, which means ‘festival of breaking of the fast’, is celebrated when the new moon is sighted.

art and culture Updated: Jun 26, 2017 07:33 IST
Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated with traditional desserts, the chief delicacy being the sewayi, and is also called Meethi Eid.
Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated with traditional desserts, the chief delicacy being the sewayi, and is also called Meethi Eid. (Shutterstock)

The festival of Eid, celebrated by Muslims across the world, marks the end of Ramzan, the holy month of fasting in the Islamic calendar when the Quran was first revealed to Prophet Muhammad. Eid marks the first day of the month of Shawwal.

Eid-al-Fitr, which means ‘festival of breaking of the fast’, is celebrated when the new moon is sighted. Due to this, the festival is sometimes celebrated on different days in different parts of the world and the date varies from year to year.

Worshippers offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Jama Mosque in Delhi. (Raj K Raj/HT File Photo)

Celebrations traditionally begin with Chand Raat, the evening before the day of Eid, when people go for Eid shopping. On the morning of Eid, worshippers get up before sunrise to offer Salat-ul-Fajr (daily prayers). After breakfast (since it is forbidden to fast on Eid), they offer prayers at mosques and often at burial grounds to pray for the salvation of departed family members.

People embrace and greet each other after offering prayers at Fatehpuri Masjid in New Delhi. (Sanchit Khanna/HT File Photo)

Worshippers wear new clothes on Eid, visit their relatives and friends, and greet each other by saying Eid Mubarak. Sweets and desserts are prepared and distributed, with the chief delicacy being the sewayi – roasted vermicelli cooked in milk and garnished with dry fruits. Unlike Eid al-Adha (which focuses on meat delicacies), Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated with traditional desserts and is also called Meethi Eid.

A young girl hugs her elders after Eid-al-Fitr prayers at Chamrajpet Idgah Maidan in Bangalore. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP File Photo)

A major Indian festival, Eid is observed as a public holiday. It is celebrated with great fervour across the country and especially at major mosques like Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, Jama Masjid in New Delhi, Dargah Sharif in Ajmer, Hazratbal shrine in Srinagar and Taj Mahal Mosque in Agra.

There is great emphasis on charity on this day. It is obligatory to donate to the poor and needy before offering prayers. The celebrations often go on for three days.

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