Etched in glass: The life and works of Hungarian artist, Miksa Róth | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Etched in glass: The life and works of Hungarian artist, Miksa Róth

In the beginning of the 20th century, Miksa Róth’s workshop was renowned for reviving glass and mosaic art in Hungary. An ongoing exhibition in Delhi presents some of his works.

art and culture Updated: Oct 23, 2017 17:10 IST
HT Correspondent
Peace, a stained glass work by Hungarian artist Miksa  Roth.
Peace, a stained glass work by Hungarian artist Miksa Roth.(Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)

A man and woman on horseback, a vine in bloom, the signs of the zodiac: Colour Drenched Sunshine, an ongoing exhibition of stained glass art by the Hungarian artist Miksa Róth in Delhi, brings works done by the artist in the twentieth century. Róth, whose workshop was credited with reviving glass and mosaic art in Hungary, founded his own business in 1885, after learning the craft at his father’s workshop. He also studied medieval stained glass works in England, France and Germany.

Hungarian stained glass artist Miksa Róth . (Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)

Soon after starting his own workshop, Róth started receiving many orders, owing to the wave of construction work happening in Budapest. His works decorated offices, business establishments, churches and synagogues, private homes and cafes and can also be seen in the Hungarian Parliament and the Royal Palace.

He collaborated with some of the best known architects of his time. For example, his workshop was commissioned to create the glass ceiling of Mexico’s National Theatre, designed by architect Géza Maróti. But tragedy struck with the World War II and in 1939, Róth was forced by the Anti-Jewish laws to close down his workshop. He died in 1944.

The exhibition of his works, presented by the Embassy of Hungary and the Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre, will be followed by a three-day art workshop, organised in collaboration with Gallery Sree Arts and inspired by the works of Róth. Below are images of some more of his works.

The Freisinger Windor of Vac, 1900 . (Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)
Tree of Knowledge, 1900. (Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)
The glass window of the Windbreak Door of the former Lederer Palace . (Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)
A 1910 work of Miksa Róth . (Photo courtesy Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre)