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Louvre makes history by hosting Ferragamo

For the first time in its almost 900-year history, the French capital's iconic Louvre Museum is opening up its storied hallways to fashion: a catwalk show by Italian house Salvatore Ferragamo.

art and culture Updated: Jun 13, 2012 18:33 IST
Salvatore Ferragamo

Paris-s-Louvre-was-the-world-s-most-visited-museum-with-a-record-8-8-million-visitors-in-2011-Photo-AFP

For the first time in its almost 900-year history, the French capital's iconic Louvre Museum is opening up its storied hallways to fashion: a catwalk show by Italian house Salvatore Ferragamo.

The mid-season resort collection being held Tuesday evening is a celebration of a brand that began as a shoemaker for Hollywood's first stars and went on to become a household name for ready-to-wear both for men and women.

The Florence-based house was granted unprecedented access to the Paris museum thanks to its sponsorship of the Louvre's current exhibition of The Virgin and Saint Anne, the last painting by Florentine master Leonardo da Vinci.

The Louvre is also respectfully tipping its hat to Florence: a city which like Paris has been a pole of creativity across the centuries.

But how can Ferragamo a house that prides itself on being Made in Italy convincingly show in Paris' most famous museum?

The key is through molding to the environment.

At a show preview Tuesday, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti told journalists he aimed to integrate French fashion techniques in his work along with the Louvre's aesthetic.

"The clothes' light colored palette is on purpose and in tune with the Louvre's light colored stone," Giornetti said.

One honey-colored mini dress with stitched beige leather patches was a strong example of this, while another dress with hundreds of light leather appliques was a nod to the traditions of Parisian haute couture highly detailed clothes, with intricate artisanal stitching.

"With the richness of detail," Giornetti added, "it could be an Italian (answer to) haute couture."