Profile: Alain Brunet | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Profile: Alain Brunet

art-and-culture Updated: Mar 03, 2008 13:01 IST
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Alain Brunet has been blending music for almost the past decade. He began playing the trumpet at the age of ten and studied under French classical trumpet player Guy Touvron. He had his formal education at the Sorbonne University in Paris where he studied musicology. He was the first to write a master’s thesis on jazz, inspired by names like Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Stravinsky, DeBussy and Ravel.



He created a jazz department in the conservatory of music of Romans and conducted a big band. During the seventies, he performed with his quartet and invited a lot of major French musicians to play with him and also went on an African tour, recording a new record about free music in 1981. In 1979, he was member of a big band for performances in north of the Europe.



He left the French jazz scene to work with the French government between 1984 and 1990, and returned to his first love by recording the first CD for “Label Bleu” in 1990.



He worked on French pop singer Serge Gainsbourg‘s music from 1992 to 1995 and performed in several jazz fests, apart from recording a CD for Warner music ‘Alain Brunet plays Gainsbourg’.



During an American and Canadian tour in 1995, he recorded a CD in Los Angeles about French songs – ‘French melodies in L.A’.



Since 1996, he has been a member of Prince Lawsha’s sextet, an orchestra from the American West Coast which recorded two CDs – ‘Planetary Rhythms album’ and ‘Sweet Mango’ – before a world concert tour in 1999.



In 2000, he created a new band “Alain Brunet the Didgeridoo Orchestra” with a didgeridoo’s player from south Pacific, Burk. He later continued to tour various countries with his unique blend of music as part of Prince Lawsha.



He now comes to India to enthrall those who love the moods that jazz can create, and would be thrilled to see how the guitar blends with the tabla, or the sarod with the trumpet, to make merry music.