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Sculptures from bronze and fibreglass

Just when you thought you had seen it all, renowned artist Paresh Maity puts together something new to the world of art. As part of his sculpture show called Cube, the artist is exhibiting sculptures made of bronze and fibreglass this month at Art Musings gallery in Colaba.

art and culture Updated: Aug 23, 2011 18:12 IST
Pooja Maheshwary

Just when you thought you had seen it all, renowned artist Paresh Maity puts together something new to the world of art. As part of his sculpture show called Cube, the artist is exhibiting sculptures made of bronze and fibreglass this month at Art Musings gallery in Colaba.



Says Maity, “I have presented two sets of works. The first is a pair of bronze sculptures representing the love between man and woman. The second is a pair of heads in fibreglass, over which I have painted in oil in basic colours like red, yellow and blue.”



In the past, the 47-year-old artist has worked with wood, ceramics, watercolours and oil on canvas. He has even used junk from old motorbikes in his artworks. “My lines and forms depict simplicity as I apply the minimalist approach. I use the cubism form while painting,” he says.



The Bengali artist is also famous for the Indian Odyssey, a massive mural depicting the diversity of India that stretches over 850 feet at the flashy, new Terminal 3 at Delhi airport. Apart from having organised 55 solo exhibitions around the world, his works are showcased in various museums and private collections including the Commonwealth headquarters in London.



Says Sangeeta Chopra, co-owner of Art Musings, “Paresh is a diverse, prolific artist. He is always ready to experiment with new mediums. In spite of working with painting, sculpture, installation, photography and video, his unique style is always identifiable.”



Apart from Maity’s sculptures, Cube will also feature works of renowned sculptors like Satish Gujral, S Nandagopal, Sakti Burman and KS Radhakrishnan. “It was an exciting project to put together,” says Chopra, adding, “It is seldom that we see a group sculpture show. Installations tend to be very compelling and invite the viewer’s full attention. So, in that respect, it was a challenge to put together a show with five important sculptors. In spite of the artists having distinct styles, there is a wonderful synergy when one walks through the entire Just when you thought you had seen it all, renowned artist Paresh Maity puts together something new to the world of art. As part of his sculpture show called Cube, the artist is exhibiting sculptures made of bronze and fibreglass this month at Art Musings gallery in Colaba.



Says Maity, “I have presented two sets of works. The first is a pair of bronze sculptures representing the love between man and woman. The second is a pair of heads in fibreglass, over which I have painted in oil in basic colours like red, yellow and blue.”



In the past, the 47-year-old artist has worked with wood, ceramics, watercolours and oil on canvas. He has even used junk from old motorbikes in his artworks. “My lines and forms depict simplicity as I apply the minimalist approach. I use the cubism form while painting,” he says.



The Bengali artist is also famous for the Indian Odyssey, a massive mural depicting the diversity of India that stretches over 850 feet at the flashy, new Terminal 3 at Delhi airport. Apart from having organised 55 solo exhibitions around the world, his works are showcased in various museums and private collections including the Commonwealth headquarters in London.



Says Sangeeta Chopra, co-owner of Art Musings, “Paresh is a diverse, prolific artist. He is always ready to experiment with new mediums. In spite of working with painting, sculpture, installation, photography and video, his unique style is always identifiable.”


Apart from Maity’s sculptures, Cube will also feature works of renowned sculptors like Satish Gujral, S Nandagopal, Sakti Burman and KS Radhakrishnan. “It was an exciting project to put together,” says Chopra, adding, “It is seldom that we see a group sculpture show. Installations tend to be very compelling and invite the viewer’s full attention. So, in that respect, it was a challenge to put together a show with five important sculptors. In spite of the artists having distinct styles, there is a wonderful synergy when one walks through the entire exhibition."


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