Trash talk | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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Trash talk

Veteran artist Vivan Sundaram continues to experiment with scrap and daily objects, uses everything from bras to balloons to create wearable artwork.

art and culture Updated: Feb 26, 2012 15:25 IST
Shweta Mehta

They’re larger than life, yet made from the most humble elements – some that you’d never even imagine wearing. But by using X-ray films, kitchen scrubbers and even tampons and sanitary pads, Vivan Sundaram’s latest show is testament to the idiom ‘One man’s trash is another man’s treasure’.

Making Strange was earlier presented at a live show in New Delhi with dancers, actors and ramp models showcasing the wearability of the 50-piece collection. Here, about 35 pieces have been brought down for display at a more conventional venue – Fort’s Chemould Prescott Gallery, where models will parade some of the elaborate creations on the opening night.

“An artist will remain an artist, but there is an element of a crossover into fashion,” admits Vivan, who worked closely with designer Pratima Pandey and an upcoming NIFT graduate, Vinay Gupta, on the garments that took three years to put together. He adds, “As ideas developed, we worked on them. My work is very hands-on. Some tailors and craftsmen also helped us.”

Prod him on whether there’s a message his works convey and he says, “In the larger sense, fashion is a part of a popular culture and is in the public domain. In some way, the garments certainly are making comments about what a material is and how it transforms itself. There are playful comments, erotic ones and some social innuendos too. So, it covers a large spectrum.”

This is his second consecutive show using trash as an important element, but the artist isn’t sure how he will make use of it in his next. He simply sums it up, saying, “The next show will have some continuities and some more questions.”

Making Strange by Vivan Sundaramwill be on display at Chemould Prescott Gallery, Fort from February 27-March 21.