Watching Big Brother | art and culture | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Mar 27, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Watching Big Brother

What can be more curious than watching an exhibition of experimental art being set up in front of your eyes? The confusion it stirs, the careful attention to detail and space it requires, while hapless helpers try to discern what’s a lump of sand and what’s a pile of bricks and what’s that got to do with anything at all?

art and culture Updated: Apr 02, 2010 21:50 IST
Jairaj Singh

What can be more curious than watching an exhibition of experimental art being set up in front of your eyes? The confusion it stirs, the careful attention to detail and space it requires, while hapless helpers try to discern what’s a lump of sand and what’s a pile of bricks and what’s that got to do with anything at all?

By George — like ‘Oh God!’ — is an exhibition by eight artists that explore the theme of surveillance through an artistic lens. According to Gitanjali Dang, the show’s curator, surveillance is sharply double-edged and it is not a yesteryear phenomenon.

The title of the show is a play on George Orwell. One of the most important political writers of the 20th Century, whose controversial book, 1984, not only showed a dystopic view and workings of a totalitarian regime but also set notions of surveillance as some sort of perverted omniscient narrator.

The works on display use ‘mixed media’ such as paintings, prints, multimedia, art installations and photographs to show the multitude of surveillance today and how its slowly inching towards an invasion of our domestic space.

So while at the entrance of the show you see a brick wall flanked by two dangling arms that point towards it, inside you see a pile of bricks with two arms that point from it. From a print portrait of the founder of social networking website Facebook’s, to a wheelbarow full of squeaky shoes to track baby feet.

The works are highly subjective and interpretations are free to be scrounged — Dang says that she left the motif entirely to the artists she felt would do something interesting.