From a world lesser known

  • Himika Chaudhuri, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
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  • Updated: Apr 03, 2013 00:44 IST

Imagine watching the sun’s rays playing on icebergs that are afloat on a dark roaring sea. You experience this sight as you stand on a jet black beach, made of cooled and hardened lava, in a little village called Jokusarlon, near Iceland. This might not be the idea of a holiday for our regular Delhiites, but you can catch a glimpse of this rivetting sight, as well as several others that have been taken in Iceland by Dr. Navin Sakhuja, a well known dental surgeon in the city, and a photographer by passion. “Iceland is like a land from a 100 years prior. The sea is dark and menacing, the beach is black and the sky gets overcast with big black clouds that look like they can gobble up the earth,” says Sakhuja of his experience of shooting in this little-known part of the world.

“And yet, the sights are so amazing that the freezing temperature and the long wait to get the right click is absolutely worth it,” says the lensman who is showing his collection of pictures of this frozen land, titled Illusions, at an exhibition that starts in the city today.

And it is not just Iceland, Sakhuja has clicked subterranean canyons, 300 feet below ground-level, in Arizona, two years back. “These are the same canyons that are the setting of the film 127 hours,” shares Sakhuja. And for someone who took up photography as a passion, this doctor’s work has been well acknowledged and his shows, sold out. “Discovery saw my photos of the canyon and agreed to present the show. They are presenting this Icelandic winterscapes exhibition as well,” says Sakhuja. Ask him what drives him to put up these photographic exhibitions despite his commitments as a doctor and he says, “It’s important to take your work to a destination. That’s what these shows are, for me.”

Catch it live
What:
Ilusions
Where: Visual Arts Gallery Indian Habitat Center, Lodhi Road
When: April 3 - 9
Timings: 10am to 8pm
Nearest metro station: Khan Market on the Violet Line

 

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