Rs 47 crore seized in Tamil Nadu since announcement of polls: EC

  • IANS, New Delhi
  • Updated: Apr 25, 2016 19:29 IST
A family looks at a decorated bus which spreads awareness about the importance of voting, ahead of the Tamil Nadu assembly elections, in Chennai. (PTI Photo)

Around Rs 47 crore in unaccounted cash have been seized in Tamil Nadu since the announcement of elections to the state assembly in March, the Election Commission said on Monday. The state goes to polls on May 16.

Of the amount, a whopping Rs11.32 crore was seized on Saturday alone, the day notification was issued for elections to the Tamil Nadu assembly.

Authorities suspect that a major part of the money is linked with hawala operations and was most likely meant to be used for the May 16 assembly polls.

“With a view to curb use of black money and likely inducement of voters in the assembly election, comprehensive instructions have been issued to the local administration, which include formation of flying squads, static surveillance teams, video surveillance teams etc,” the EC said in a statement.

Police and other agencies such as Income Tax department, customs and state excise department have been asked to monitor production, distribution, sale and storage of liquor and other intoxicants during the election process, the EC said.

As many as 702 flying squads and 712 static surveillance teams have been deployed in the state to check unethical and illegal practices during elections.

“Complaints relating to transportation of illegal cash, liquor, narcotics are being monitored round the clock,” EC added.

The commission said that teams of special observers have been deployed in the state to review poll preparedness. Also, the number of expenditure observers has been increased manifold.

Probationary officers of the Indian Police Service will also be deployed in each district to actively participate in expenditure monitoring and operation of the flying squads, the EC said.

also read

Jayalalithaa’s populist poll promises can hurt TN in long run, say experts
Show comments