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Top driving tips from the three million mile man

In the same week that Ford confirmed that it is bringing back a host of physical knobs and switches to its car dashboards in order to reduce driver distractions, Irv Gordon, the current record holder for the longest distance traveled by a single driver in a singe car gives his top tips for trouble-free motoring.

autos Updated: Jun 25, 2013 12:37 IST
Irv-Gordon-with-his-1966-Volvo-P1800-Photo-AFP
Irv-Gordon-with-his-1966-Volvo-P1800-Photo-AFP

In the same week that Ford confirmed that it is bringing back a host of physical knobs and switches to its car dashboards in order to reduce driver distractions, Irv Gordon, the current record holder for the longest distance traveled by a single driver in a singe car gives his top tips for trouble-free motoring.

As infotainment and telematics replace in-car entertainment and in-car creature comforts, more and more functions that were once accessed via a switch, button or knob have been replaced by touchscreen operations or voice commands. However, according to The Wall Street Journal, drivers are finding the screens less than intuitive and if anything more distracting for simple tasks such as adjusting the volume of the music or changing the radio channels – hence Ford’s decision to include switches alongside its screens from 2014 – but still appreciate infotainment systems such as Ford’s SYNC for accessing their phones hands-free and for checking emails and using GPS.

However, Irv Gordon, who is set to become the first person to drive three million miles in the same car -- a 1966 Volvo P1800 -- says that electronic devices have no place in a car when safe and distraction-free driving is required. "Make a rule that nothing requiring a battery charge reside in the front of the car. Cell phones, MP3 players, DVD players, etc. They are all potential distractions. Put them in the back or even in the trunk," Gordon said. "In fact, make a rule that everyone put their gadgets away. Road trips are wonderful times to reconnect with family members and enjoy the beautiful views this nation offers."

Buckle up

"It's the most important thing you and your family will do on a roadway.”

Expect other drivers to make mistakes.

"Be observant of your fellow drivers. Don't assume a car pulling up to a stop sign will stop until you see it stop. Allow five to six seconds of time between you and the car in front of you. If a car is tailgating you, try to let that car pass."

Take a break

"This is not NASCAR; it's okay to take long breaks to stretch your legs, breathe fresh air and review your maps. It keeps you more alert on the road," Gordon says.

Inspect your car every week

"Even the most mechanically challenged car owners can look for low fluid levels or deteriorating belts and hoses. Also look to see that the battery connections are tight and corrosion free. These are the most common sources of trouble on the road. And, walk around your car to ensure the blinkers, brake lights, etc., are in proper working condition."

Adjust the mirrors

"Rearview mirrors aren't ‘vanity mirrors' designed for admiring your hair or applying lipstick. Automotive engineers spent countless hours designing your car so that these mirrors would reduce blind spots when driving. Do the engineers a favor, and adjust your mirrors accordingly."

Ensure proper tire inflation

"There is a reason all service stations have air pumps and every mechanic has a tire gauge in his or her shirt pocket. Having your tires properly inflated is as important as having oil in your engine."

Don't drive if you can't stand the conditions

"Is it too late in the night? Too rainy? Too snowy? Too hot? Too cold? When you're driving, it's not the time to be daring. If you haven't gotten enough sleep, if the roads are too wet, or if anything else will inhibit your ability to drive safely, pull over at a rest stop or stay the night at a hotel. Maybe they'll have a swimming pool and a complimentary breakfast."

When your car makes a funny noise, listen to it

"Don't turn up the radio and hope that knocking noise goes away. It won't. If your car develops a condition, take it in immediately. The longer you wait, the greater potential for danger."

Weatherize your car year-round

"Prepare for the climate you'll be visiting and the season that is approaching, not just the one that's going on now. Have a qualified mechanic check your tire inflation, treads, brake wear, fluids, etc., and let him or her know the type of weather in which you could be driving."