HC cancels order annulling admission of medical students | bhopal | Hindustan Times
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HC cancels order annulling admission of medical students

The Madhya Pradesh high court on Tuesday struck down an order issued by the directorate of medical education (DME) cancelling admission of some students to medical colleges in the state.

bhopal Updated: Nov 09, 2016 13:00 IST
There is no clarity on whether all the 37 students would be reinstated or only those who moved the court.
There is no clarity on whether all the 37 students would be reinstated or only those who moved the court.(Pic for representation)

The Madhya Pradesh high court on Tuesday struck down an order issued by the directorate of medical education (DME) cancelling admission of some students to medical colleges in the state.

The order came after 26 of the 37 affected students and some Right to Information (RTI) activists moved the court challenging the DME’s order.  

However, there is no clarity on whether all the 37 students would be reinstated or only those who moved the court. The order also did not specify weathers seats would be allotted in the private medical colleges or the government colleges.

On October 7, through offline counselling, the DME filled 468 seats into different medical colleges of the state. But later it came to light that 37 students were granted admission in excess to intake capacity of three private medical colleges while a seat in government colleges was left vacant.

To rectify the mistake, the DME issued termination orders to 37 students without taking the merit into account.

The admission was conducted through the National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET) to ensure selection strictly on merit. “How come only 262 seats were filled through the online (admission) process on the last day as against 468 seats filled off-line? While it took 35 hours to fill up the online seats, it took only four hours to fill the offline seats! It smells of corruption,” says RTI activist and former MLA Paras Saklecha, who has been fighting for the right of the students.

The Supreme Court had earlier directed the DME to fill maximum number of seats through online counselling by giving preference to domicile students and fill remaining seats offline strictly on the basis of merit.

Apparently, the directive was not followed as “non-domicile and less meritorious” students got admission, alleged several RTI activists.

The authorities, however, cited a technical glitches for fewer students getting admission through online process. A senior official involved in the counselling process told HT that there were some problems in the BSNL cable connection at the Gandhi Medical College, which had hit the online admission for some time.

“We had to call BSNL’s technician to fix the problem,” the official said on condition of anonymity.

RTI activist Dr Anand Rai alleged that private medical colleges in connivance with medical education department officials sold seats for `50-60 lakh.

The allegations were bolstered after some of the private institutions charged extra money in the name of caution and other miscellaneous fees, though Association of Fees Regulatory Committee had fixed the tuition fees.