10 pearls of wisdom from Satyajit Ray for aspiring filmmakers | bollywood | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 16, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

10 pearls of wisdom from Satyajit Ray for aspiring filmmakers

On Satyajit Ray's 94th birth anniversary, we have compiled a list of 10 beautiful quotes from the maestro that can act as the guiding light for aspiring filmmakers.

bollywood Updated: May 02, 2015 11:35 IST
Bhumika Sharma
Satyajit-Ray-at-Bishop-Lefroy-RD-House-Calcutta-in-1962-HT-Photo
Satyajit-Ray-at-Bishop-Lefroy-RD-House-Calcutta-in-1962-HT-Photo

Satyajit Ray is among those filmmakers who have inspired a whole generation of filmmakers to come up with novel and socially oriented stories. The maverick director created a stir in the world cinema with his very first film Pather Panchali in 1955, and went on to grab the attention of legendary filmmakers across the globe. On his 94th anniversary, we have compiled a list of 10 beautiful quotes from the maestro that can act as the guiding light for aspiring filmmakers.



1. When I’m shooting on location, you get ideas on the spot – new angles. You make no major changes but important modifications that you can’t do on a set. I do that because you have to be economical.



http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/popup/2015/5/Ray.jpg



Satyajit Ray on the sets of Sonar kella. (HT Photo)



2.
When I write an original story I write about people I know first-hand and situations I’m familiar with. I don’t write stories about the nineteenth century.



3. There’s always some room for improvisation.



4. I wouldn’t mind taking a rest for three or four months, but I have to keep on making films for the sake of my crew, who just wait for the next film because they’re not on a fixed salary.



5. Particularly in the final stages I always find that I’m rushed. It’s dangerous when you’re rushed in the editing stage; most of my early films are flawed in the cutting.



6. You cannot go beyond a certain limit in your expenditure if you want to bring back money from your local market, which is very small after Pakistan.



7. I mix Indian instruments with Western instruments all the time.



8. I had developed this habit of writing scenarios as a hobby. I would find out which stories had been sold to be made into films and I would write my own treatment and then compare it.



http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/popup/2015/5/patherpanchali.jpg



A still from Pather Panchali.



9.
Well the Bombay film wasn’t always like how it is now. It did have a local industry. There were realistic films made on local scenes. But it gradually changed over the years.



10. I was interested in both Western and Indian classical music.