‘A’ for Aakrosh | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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‘A’ for Aakrosh

Priyadarshan’s Aakrosh had run into trouble with the Central Board of Film Certification (CFBC). However Ajay Devgn-Akshaye Khanna film on hounour killings gets an adult certificate with five cuts.

bollywood Updated: Oct 01, 2010 13:54 IST
Hiren Kotwani

After Prakash Jha’s Raajneeti earlier this year, Priyadarshan’s Aakrosh had run into trouble with the Central Board of Film Certification (CFBC). However, everything is sorted now and the film, based on honour killings that have taken place in the country in the past year, has been issued an ‘A’ certificate with about five dialogue cuts.



Confirming the news, Alpana Pant Sharma, regional officer, CBFC, Mumbai, says, "Some lines were a bit derogatory towards castes, Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and women, and were asked to be removed. The producer and director agreed to the revising committee’s suggestions and accepted the ‘A’ rating for their movie."



Saving 30 cuts

Producer Kumar Mangat and director Priyadarshan are believed to be pleased with the developments. More so since the examining committee, which saw Aakrosh last week, was said to have suggested nearly 30 dialogue cuts and were willing to issue a ‘U/A’ certificate.



AakroshKumar and Priyadarshan disagreed with the rating and approached the revising committee. Speaking of the examining committee’s suggestion, Pant Sharma said, "It was important to consider the sensitivity of the caste issue in the movie," adding that filmmakers are always free to approach the revising committee if they disagree. Also, if they didn’t agree the second time, they can approach the Appellate Tribunal, as Prakash Jha did for Raajneeti earlier this year.



Mystery plot

The story of Aakrosh, set in 2001, based in the fictitious town of Jhanjhargaon in North India, starts with the disappearance of three college students who go to watch the Ramleela staged in their village. A few days later, they are reported to have been killed. Ajay Devgn and Akshaye Khanna play the two CBI officers from Delhi sent to the village to investigate the mysterious deaths. That’s when they discover a thriving nexus between police and local politicians in caste-related murders.

On his part, Mangat says, “The cuts they asked for earlier would have dampened the impact of the storyline. These are minor cuts that don’t affect the point that we are making through the film.”