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Abbas-Mustan bring in black!

Abhishek Bachchan gets black jackets for men in white so they don’t merge with snow in the North Pole. From their shirts and trousers to their shoes and occasional jackets, the director duo is always dressed in spotless white.

bollywood Updated: Nov 15, 2011 17:31 IST
Roshmila Bhattacharya

For years now, directors Abbas-Mustan haven’t worn any other colour, but white. From their shirts and trousers to their shoes and occasional jackets, the director duo is always dressed in spotless white. But earlier this year, when they were filming Players in Murmansk, Russia, Abhishek Bachchan went shopping and returned with three black-hooded jackets for the duo and their editor brother, Hussain.



The actor was worried that the trio, in their all-white attire, would merge with the snow. “And guess how they repaid me for my thoughtfulness?” says Abhishek, tongue-in-cheek. “By making me take a dip in a frozen lake with the temperature dipping to minus 10 degrees and the biting Arctic wind adding to the chill.”



The Indian remake of the The Italian Job is the first Bollywood film to be shot at the Arctic circle. Several action sequences, including one that required Abhishek to jump from a crane onto a running train, were shot there. In another, Abhishek was supposed to emerge from a frozen lake.



Safety officers in Siberia were initially leery of giving permission for such a shoot, pointing out that in the sub-zero temperature, anyone would freeze to death in 30 seconds.



“But eventually, we were able to convince them to let us take the shot after we’d taken all the required precautions,” says Abhishek, adding, “It’s a 10-15 second shot, but as I emerged from the water, I felt as if every muscle in my body had frozen. As soon as the unit heard “cut”, members started throwing hot water at me to prevent hypothermia or frost bite. Fortunately, there were no after-effects. Though, with 22 hours of sunlight, we had the longest working days ever. Since it was bright till way past midnight, and the sun would be up again by 3 am, sleep was hard to come by. It was an unforgettable experience.”