Acting on TV helps in Bollywood: Aditya Kapoor | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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Acting on TV helps in Bollywood: Aditya Kapoor

Aditya Roy Kapoor feels working as a VJ helped him during Guzaarish and Action Replayy. Find out more about the actor and his experience working with different directors.

bollywood Updated: Nov 04, 2010 18:43 IST
Serena Menon

The former VJ will soon be seen playing the second lead in Vipul Shah’s Action Replayy. Right after, he will be seen playing a respectable part in Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Guzaarish. And even though he has no professional training in acting, his four-and-a-half-year career as a VJ on Channel V has acted as an advantage. Or so he claims.



"I was never interested in acting in films," says Kapoor, who was more than happy VJ-ing. "I ended up for the audition of Vipul’s (Shah) London Dreams (2009) because I felt guilty for saying no to so many others. Then I got through! I thought getting to go to London and playing a guitar for my part was pretty cool."



Action ReplayyTube trained

Even though Kapoor has been taking classes in diction to clear his speech, he feels being on camera for numerous hours for television helps one get comfortable on screen, and off screen as well. "I have seen people who have studied acting and that’s great. But TV helped me, all those years in that field is the reason I am here doing what I am doing."



Kapoor will be playing Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Akshay Kumar’s son in Action Replayy. "I play Bunty, a troubled and confused young boy whose parents’ relationship isn’t what he would like it to be, so I try to sort their issues out," says Kapoor. He is playing the role of a young man, Omar Siddhiqui, in Guzaarish. "I am a student of sorts and a helper in the house who comes into Hrithik Roshan and Aishwarya’s life. During the course of the film Hrithik starts training him."

Poles apart
When asked how it was working with the two directors — Sanjay Leela Bhansali and Vipul Shah — who make films that are poles apart, he says, “That’s not something planned. Sanjay’s perception is very different. He’s funny and cool, working with him is like going to school. On the other hand, Vipul is really calm on the sets. I was doing scenes with the likes of Om Puri, and he made he feel really comfortable.”

Though he hasn’t found any script striking so far, he will take things as they come, without any preference to directors or genres. “I can’t pick anything right now,” he smiles.