Actor Adil Hussain says it’s a crime to deprive the audience of good cinema | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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Actor Adil Hussain says it’s a crime to deprive the audience of good cinema

Actor Adil Hussain, whose short film Chutney has been widely appreciated, says he is bothered by the fact that the audience is not getting to know about the cinema which is deeper and more layered.

bollywood Updated: Nov 04, 2017 17:40 IST
Juhi Chakraborty
Actor Adil Hussain wants people from the film industry to feel more responsible towards the audience.
Actor Adil Hussain wants people from the film industry to feel more responsible towards the audience.(Yogen Shah)

Actor Adil Hussain is worried that the audience is mostly being exposed to mediocre films and he feels that it may result in them not being able to develop a taste for good cinema. The actor, who has starred in Hindi film English Vinglish, several regional movies as well as international projects like The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Life of Pi, says it is the job of actors and filmmakers to give the audience more food for thought.

“What bothers me is that if people might not get to know about great cinema. We are depriving the audience from something which is deeper, more layered and complex,” says Adil.

“We are not helping them to evolve as cinema-goers; we are not helping them to become rasik — one who appreciates things when it gets more complex. Mediocrity is being promoted and in the end, the audience might start idealising something which is mediocre,” he adds.

“I don’t get how somebody spotted at the airport is more important than a great small-budget film? I think it is a crime to deprive the audience of good cinema”

The actor also fails to understand why so much attention is given to what people wear over what kind of films are made. He says in the process of people focusing on all the frills, several good films get lost without a trace.

“We hear about who’s wearing which designer. I have no problem with that but we have to identify what is more important — clothes or the good stories. Also, I don’t get how somebody spotted at the airport is more important than a great small-budget film? I think it is a crime to deprive the audience of good cinema,” he asserts.

The actor has been invited to be a part of the Building Bridges Film Festival in Bahrain, which will showcase documentaries and films on the refugee crisis and women’s empowerment.

“I am very happy to be invited at this event. International curators are involved in this festival to bring the focus on the problems that the world is facing including India with the Rohingya crisis,” he says about the festival, which runs from November 1 to 15.