Bollywood’s niche directors launch short films made by children from NGO | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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Bollywood’s niche directors launch short films made by children from NGO

Directors Kiran Rao, Anurag Kashyap and Vikramaditya Motwane will launch three short films made by delinquents from an NGO called Aangan that works to rehabilitate and look after young offenders.

bollywood Updated: Mar 14, 2011 16:06 IST
Serena Menon

Most good things happening in Bollywood in the recent past seem to be led by the industry’s new wave filmmakers. And in yet another inning, indie directors Kiran Rao, Anurag Kashyap and Vikramaditya Motwane will launch three short films made by delinquents from an NGO called Aangan that works to rehabilitate and look after young offenders.

The event, which will include the screening of the films, will take place at Mehboob Studio on Wednesday at 7.30 pm in the presence of the filmmakers. Among them will also be Vijay Krishna Acharya, writer of Guru (2008) and Dhoom (2007), supporting the groups of young directors.

Kiran RaoSays Shailja Mehta, trustee, Aangan, "The idea is to start a discussion about the state of these children. We try and bring focus to the cycle of vulnerability and crime, by bringing them out of certain high-risk areas like Govandi, Bhiwandi, Antop Hill and Dongri and helping them make better choices."

Each of the three films called Jaan, Shaan, Imaan — Love, Pride, Honour — have been scripted, produced and filmed by groups of 15 to 18 boys from the NGO. In a rough state at the moment, the three will be screened together as a 10-odd minute short film, which tells the stories of circumstances that led the boys’ into a vicious circle of crime through remand homes and juvenile jail.

“We use different creative methods to help them develop a better understanding of society. They can’t be made to sit and lectured, so we found that film, as a language, appealed to them very much. They get to learn a skill at the end of such programmes and they choose topics that relate to their lives, issues, communities, risky behaviour and choices they see their peers make,” explains Shailja, explaining why Aangan chose cinema as a medium of expression and understanding to deal with these children.