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Chittagong eyes international film festivals

Chittagong is all set to travel to top tier international film festivals like Cannes, Berlin, Toronto and Venice next year. Director Bedabrato Pain’s action-drama was delayed twice earlier. Here's more about the film.

bollywood Updated: Dec 27, 2010 19:00 IST
Priyanka Jain
Priyanka Jain
Hindustan Times
Chittagong

Chittagong is all set to travel to top tier international film festivals like Cannes, Berlin, Toronto and Venice next year. Director Bedabrato Pain’s (also known as Bedo) action-drama was delayed twice earlier, once due to his son’s accidental death and the second time when the release date clashed with a big budget film along similar lines.

A former scientist at NASA, Bedo didn’t deny the development about the international interest in his film. He says, “Things have been getting jinxed for a long time, so I don’t want to say anything till something materialises. But there is some positive movement with regards to the film.”

Our source explains that the movie is garnering a lot of interest worldwide. “International distribution companies have shown interest in the film, which could mean a bigger release and publicity for Chittagong.” Bedo has already found support in filmmakers like Anurag Kashyap and Vishal Bhardwaj. Kashyap who has seen the film says, “Manoj Bajpai has giving a fantastic performance. Everyone must go watch this film.”

Co produced by Shonali Bose (director of Amu), the film toplines Manoj Bajpai and Barry John. Chittagong credits read big names like Oscar winner Resul Pookutty (sound), Shankar Ehsaan Loy (music) and Prasoon Joshi (lyrics). Set in the turbulent times of 1930s British India, this film is a true story of a 14-year-old boy, Jhunku Roy (played by debutant Vijay Varma) and his journey to find where he belongs.

“Roy had impulsively joined the freedom movement after he was called a traitor by his peers. He was forced to confront his self-doubts as his world turned upside down,” says the director who didn’t want to tell the cliché ending-in-despair patriotic story.

“So,” he adds, “I chose to tell the tale of the kid who lived post Chittagong and participated in many more freedom struggles.” The film ends with a rare actual interview of the 92-year-old toothless freedom fighter talking about the battle of Jalalabad.

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