‘I want to live in India’ | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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‘I want to live in India’

Pakistani actor Ali Zafar, after a cameo in Luv Ka The End that opens today, and Mere Brother Ki Dulhan that opens later in the year, is in talks for two more Bollywood movie assignments — a rom-com and another film on relationships.

bollywood Updated: May 07, 2011 17:25 IST
Rachana Dubey

Pakistani actor Ali Zafar, after a cameo in Luv Ka The End that opens today, and Mere Brother Ki Dulhan that opens later in the year, is in talks for two more Bollywood movie assignments — a rom-com and another film on relationships.

These movies, he says, are expected to roll over the next two months. So the singer-actor will be stationed in India for a while now. But when asked if he ever plans to get a permanent address in Mumbai, he admits he’s not interested.

“Let’s assume that I’ve bought or rented a place here and my wife shifts here too. I’ll have to hire staff to look after the house. I’ll have to get involved in too many formalities that go hand-in-hand when you buy or lease a place in India, especially if you are not an Indian citizen,” argues Ali, who is still completing patchwork on Mere Brother Ki Dulhan, where he plays the second lead opposite Katrina Kaif. “Besides, wherever I go, and for however long I’m in India, I’m put up at five-star hotels that offer everything from food and accommodation to gyms and pools. So why get stuck with all this?”

Does that mean Ali doesn’t plan to shift base to India despite working here for most parts of the year? “I want to and I’m hoping to move here soon. But there’s family at home in Pakistan that I have to go back to when I finish work. Another reason I’ve not bought or rented a pad in Mumbai is because I keep travelling, and I won’t occupy the place for most of the year,” he points out.

It’s said that like most Pakistani artistes travelling to India for work, it’s difficult for him to get a work visa. So, buying property would be a distant dream. “I don’t know about others, but the visa is hardly a problem for me,” says Ali. “At times, it gets delayed, but I’ve never been denied a visa to travel to India. Everyone from the producers to the embassy have been co-operative and I’m hoping relations remain that way.”