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Indian brains behind RA.One game

Art director Sabu Cyril reveals that the interactive feature was made in the country, the high-end bike in the film is actually a modified Pulsar.

bollywood Updated: Oct 08, 2011 16:12 IST
Dibyojyoti Baksi

Actor Shah Rukh Khan made sure that he brought the best of technicians from across the world on board for his ambitious sci-fi film RA.One. If it’s deemed that the high-end interactive computer game featured in the movie was also developed abroad, art director Sabu Cyril clarifies that it was made in India.



“I am happy that instead of assigning the production of the computer game featured in the movie to foreign companies, we have made it here,” says Cyril. He also says that Shah Rukh, who plays G.One in the film, hasn’t compromised in any respect to ensure that the superhero film adheres to international standards.



“The film was planned meticulously and I think we got the best people to work for it. Shah Rukh has worked on it in a very tasteful manner. He took care of everything diligently,” he says. “It was a difficult film to handle but we have put our heart and soul to make it as close to as it was conceived,” he adds.



The art director also reveals that the uniquely designed street-hawk bike that Shah Rukh is seen riding in the film, is actually a modified Bajaj Pulsar bike.



“The bike had to look very advanced and out-of-the-world, so it was accessorised with fibre and fashionable lights to resemble a futuristic machine,” says Cyril, a four- time National Award-winner in best art direction for Thenmavin Kombath (1995), Kalapani (1996), Om Shanti Om (2007) and Enthiran (2010).



Cyril, who has worked on 3D projects such as Tamil film Magic Magic before, which was named Chota Jadugar (2003) in Hindi, feels that a lot more could have been done with RA.One had the they known that the movie would eventually be converted into 3D. “Originally, there was no plan of making it 3D. If we knew, may be we could have done more. Making a film in 3D requires absolutely different set-up than making it in 2D,” says Cyril. He, however, assures, “the film came out quite well.”