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Its poetic justice: Kunal Kohli

Director Kunal Kohli ecstatic after song from Teri Meri Kahaani trends at number one on Twitter minutes after its digital launch

bollywood Updated: May 19, 2012 15:02 IST
Kavita Awaasthi
Locked-in-a-romantic-embrace-the-two-look-fresh-together
Locked-in-a-romantic-embrace-the-two-look-fresh-together

Social networking sites are popular marketing and publicity tools. And when a just-launched song from an upcoming film begins trending on Twitter worldwide, it makes for news.

Producer-director Kunal Kohli couldn’t believe that within minutes of launching ‘That’s all I really wanna do’, from his upcoming Shahid Kapoor-Priyanka Chopra starrer, Teri Meri Kahaani, the track began trending at number one on Twitter worldwide, and in India, it even stayed on the top five list for over two days.

Says Kohli, “That’s the beauty of the lyrics written by Prasoon Joshi. Foreigners were using it as a catchphrase as they didn’t know it was a Hindi film song, but Indians have heard and loved it. With the video still not out, it is amazing to see that a catchphrase can get so popular.” The song was released online on the website of Erosnow and other websites where one can download the entire album.

“Romance today happens via BBM, Twitter and SMS. When you aren’t with someone you love, you can still experience the feeling of being with him/her virtually by sharing pictures and videos. In the song, Priyanka and Shahid are in two different colleges, but they stay virtually connected. It’s poetic justice that a song that depicts how SMS and BBM are used by the youth, becomes a trend on Twitter,” says Kohli.

The soft romantic duet is sung by Shaan and Shreya Ghoshal. Kohli reveals that while Shahid loves the song Mukhtasar the most from the album, Priyanka’s favourite is ‘Jabse mere dil ko’, a song with a retro feel, picturised in the 1960s.

Lyricist Prasoon Joshi adds, “The song doesn’t take itself too seriously, and people are connecting with it because it reflects today’s easy and effortless language.”

Prasoon recalls writing Mukhtasar, which is already on air, while he was in bed with a bad back. “Words like Mukhtasar and Masakali come to me out of nowhere and people ask me what they mean. Muktasar means ‘brief’. I guess such words just pop into my mind,” he says.