Kashyap, Bhardwaj unite for film | bollywood | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Feb 28, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Kashyap, Bhardwaj unite for film

Directors throw weight behind Chittagong, delayed to avoid clash with Abhishek Bachchan’s Khelein Hum Jee Jaan Sey. With a little help from important colleagues, the much-delayed historic project, Chittagong, will finally see a release.

bollywood Updated: Nov 08, 2011 16:50 IST
Priyanka Jain
Priyanka Jain
Hindustan Times
Chittagong

With a little help from important colleagues, the much-delayed historic project, Chittagong, will finally see a release. And director Bedabrato Pain (Bedo) has supporters like Anurag Kashyap (Dev.D, 2009), Vishal Bhardwaj (Raajneeti, 2010) and Rakyesh Omprakash Mehra (Rang De Basanti, 2006) to thank.



The film’s lead actor, Manoj Bajpai, says, "If the film is good, no one can stop it from being a success. The setback has given us more strength and conviction. Anurag, Vishal and Rakyesh saw the film and promised to make sure it releases soon."



He adds, "Anurag wants this film to release before his next directorial venture, Gangs of Wasseypur."



KashyapApparently Abhishek Bachchan's big budget Khelein Hum Jee Jaan Se (2010), which was based on the same subject, proved to be a hurdle for Chittagong’s release.



Inside sources reveal that producers deferred the latter’s release because certain industry heavyweights close to Ashutosh Gowarikar’s project didn’t want the two movies to clash.



On hearing the news, Anurag expressed his anger on a social networking site, but couldn’t stop the producer’s decision. Bedo and his wife Shonali Bose, who were already dealing with the untimely death of their son, decided not to comment on the reason behind the delay.



Ironically, Khelein hum… didn’t do well at the box office while Chittagong received positive reviews at festivals in Berlin, Toronto and Venice. Ask Kashyap for his opinion and the director says, "Manoj has given a fantastic performance."



The film toplines Manoj and Barry John, and the credits read big names like Oscar-winner Resul Pookutty (sound) and Shankar Ehsaan Loy (music).



Set in the turbulent 1930s in British India, it’s the true story of a 14-year-old boy, Jhunku Roy (played by debutant Vijay Varma), and his journey.



It ends with a rare interview of the 92-year-old freedom fighter talking about his memories of the battle of Jalalabad