No one has said that I can’t act: Sonakshi Sinha | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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No one has said that I can’t act: Sonakshi Sinha

bollywood Updated: Aug 14, 2013 17:30 IST
Kavita Awaasthi
Kavita Awaasthi
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

There’s no stopping Sonakshi Sinha. She’s been in the industry for only two-and-half years and already has six releases to her name. Currently, she is shooting for her 10th film. With promotions on in full swing for her next release, Once Upon A Time In Mumbai Dobaara (OUATIMD), the actor claims she chooses her projects instinctively. In this candid chat, she also talks about her strong personality while dismissing that she is a lucky mascot for filmmakers.

Does being called a lucky mascot put pressure on you?
I don’t pay attention to it. I am happy with my work, going for shoots and returning home. It’s not my job to think about the box-office figures. My job as an actor ends when the director says cut. Such things aren’t added pressure; they just urge me to do better. Luckily, I haven’t been called ‘lucky mascot’ as such. People have realised that luck can take you only up to a point. I have been in the industry for two-and-a-half years and am currently shooting my 10th film. I don’t think that’s happened with any other newcomer as far as I can remember. I am blessed, but it’s also due to my hard work. No one has said that I can’t act, emote, dance etc. So my work has been noticed. I would like to say that I am a good combination of luck and hard work.

Being a confident person in real life, was it tough to play a damsel in distress in OUATIMD?
Yes, I am a strong person and there’s no damsel bit in me. I like putting other people in distress (laughs). As for this role, I thoroughly enjoyed playing it, as my character is pivotal in this love triangle, which is beautifully written. She’s stuck and torn between two wonderful men, who are mentor and protégé. She is an innocent character who comes from Kashmir to Mumbai to become an actor.

Having acted in period movies, if it was possible, which era would you like to live in?
I would love to experience the era that Lootera was set in — the ’60s. That film was a once-in-a-lifetime kind of project. And now that people have loved the film and appreciated it, I hope the makers will keep me in mind when scripts like that come along or when they have strong female lead roles. Vikram (Vikramaditya Motwane, director) took a risk by offering me the film and I pulled it off.

What’s next in line for you?
Post OUATIMD’s release on August 15, I will be shooting for Rambo Rajkumar. There’s no break for me. I have to complete Bullett Raja; then there’s the remake of Thuppaki with director AR Murugadoss. I will also start Prabhudheva’s next with Ajay Devgn and, by the year-end, will work on a film with Arjun Kapoor. I took a break after Lootera’s release and went to London for a few days. That was my first break since I started working on my debut film. But I enjoy the pace, so I have no complaints.