Rock On 2, Force 2, Kahaani 2: Bollywood is riding high on sequels | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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Rock On 2, Force 2, Kahaani 2: Bollywood is riding high on sequels

bollywood Updated: Dec 10, 2016 18:35 IST
Rukmini Chopra
Rukmini Chopra
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Rock On 2, Tum Bin 2, Force 2 and Kahaani 2 are slated to release in November and December this year.

While Hollywood is rife with franchises and sequels, Bollywood is also following suit. B-Town is soon going to see four sequels releasing within just two months this year — Rock On 2, Force 2, Kahaani 2 and Tum Bin 2.

2017 also promises to be a year of sequels with Aankhein 2, Jolly LLB 2 and Golmaal 4, among others, scheduled to hit the theatres.

However, trade analyst Komal Nahta maintains that the Hindi film industry has a long way to go. “In Hollywood, they have dedicated writers. In India, the people who work on sequels aren’t that dedicated,” he says.

However, trade analyst Komal Nahta maintains that the Hindi film industry has a long way to go. “In Hollywood, they have very dedicated writers. In India, the people working on sequels aren’t that dedicated,” he says.

An easy way out

With consistent casting and a familiar story, it seems shelling out on sequels is an easy way for producers to make money. While film-maker Rakesh Roshan announced Krrish 4 three years after he made Krrish 3 (2013), Aankhein 2 was announced by producer Gaurang Doshi after nearly 14 years.

Gaurang admits that producers are looking to make money through this trend. “Of course, sequels are money-churners. Once you make a brand out of a film, you obviously would like to take it to the next level,” he says.

Speaking of Krrish 4, Rakesh says that the film is a sequel in “it’s true sense.”

Roshan, however, says that his intention is not the same with the latest instalment of the Krrish series. “Krrish 4 is a sequel in the true sense. I don’t make a movie and then call it a sequel for the sake of it unlike other film-makers.”

Watch: Trailer of Kahaani 2

The convenient truth

Trade analyst Amul Vikas Mohan says that though sequels are a convenient way to make films and money, they don’t justify the lack of creativity on a film-maker’s part. “Sequels require the same amount of hard work, but it’s definitely more convenient, as it’s a hit formula already,” adds Amul.

A sill from Vidya Balan’s upcoming film Kahaani 2, which is a sequel to Kahaani.

Nahta, however, has a different point of view. He maintains that producers look for ways to “put in less effort” to churn out films. “Only 12% to 15% of the films in the industry are successful, and the same applies to sequels. Those interested in making sequels think that their films will be good and others will flop,” he says.

Differentiating between sequels and franchises, trade analyst Komal Nahta says that the Munnabhai series can be defined as the latter.

Sequels vs franchises

Amul also says that in India, there’s a lot of confusion between the terms ‘sequel’ and ‘franchise’. “We tend to term sequels as franchises. If the principal cast of the first film is seen in the second one and the story is taken forward, it’s essentially a sequel. But if the film has some kind of similarity with the first one, it’s called a franchise,” he clarifies.

Watch: Trailer of Force 2

Nahta agrees, asserting that the practice of confusing the two terms is wrong. “We tend to call movies ‘sequels’ even if it is part of a franchise. The Munnabhai series can be defined as a franchise. But Sarkar 2 was a sequel.”

Casting coup

new faces in sequels. For instance, Preity Zinta was the female lead in Koi… Mil Gaya (2003), but in its sequel, Krrish (2006), she was replaced with Priyanka Chopra, and Kangana Ranaut was added to the star cast in Krrish 3 (2013).

Watch: Trailer of Rock On 2

Ask casting director Mukesh Chhabra about roping in new faces in sequels, and he says, “At times, it depends on the actor’s availability. Sometimes the actors don’t want to be part of a sequel. Producers also look forward to building their films with newer names”.