There’s far more censorship in TV than in films: Harsh Chhaya | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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There’s far more censorship in TV than in films: Harsh Chhaya

Says the actor, adding that unlike in the film industry, one doesn’t even have the ‘’space” to question censorship in television.

bollywood Updated: Jun 13, 2016 20:18 IST
Rukmini Chopra
Harsh Chhaya maintains that there’s no space to question censorship in the television industry.
Harsh Chhaya maintains that there’s no space to question censorship in the television industry.


Unlike several television actors, who leave the medium when they enter Bollywood, Harsh Chhaya has worked in both industries since the beginning of his career. Be it playing a wealthy boss in a TV show, Hasratein, or a gay designer in Madhur Bhandarkar’s Fashion (2008), the actor has explored a variety of work.

Giving an example of film-maker Anurag Kashyap’s ongoing clash with the CBFC (Central Board of Film Certification) over his upcoming film, Harsh maintains that actors in television, don’t even have the “space” to question censorship.

Be it playing a wealthy boss in a TV show, Hasratein, or a gay designer in Madhur Bhandarkar’s Fashion (2008), the actor has explored a variety of work.

“There’s no space for one to object or react. There are certain things that small-screen actors just can’t do. There’s no room for arguments,” he says, adding, “There’s far more censorship in television than in films.” The actor says that there are certain guidelines that TV actors have to follow. “It is like a mother controlling a young child,” the actor says. Harsh will be seen sharing screen space with Anil Kapoor in an upcoming TV drama series. “I have shot for a few episodes with Anil. The experience was fabulous,” says Harsh adding, “One is always anxious about working with a star, but Anil made things comfortable for everyone.”

Read: TV scenario is creatively bankrupt: Harsh Chhaya

The actor says that though he hasn’t signed a Hindi film, he has been busy with a Bengali and a Gujarati project. “There’s an ongoing movement in Gujarati cinema that I’m happy about,” he says. Ask him whether regional films deserve the prime-time slot in theatres, and Harsh says, “Regional cinema has always had an audience. It should get its own space. Everything cannot be hogged by Bollywood and Hollywood.”

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