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Tiger’s feeble roar

Ek Tha Tiger was filmed in more than 10 countries ranging from Turkey and the Czech Republic to Cuba and Hong Kong. And the music composers have tried to bring out the multi-cultural settings in the film’s soundtrack.

bollywood Updated: Jul 24, 2012 18:10 IST
Nirmika Singh

Film: Ek Tha Tiger
Music: Sohail Sen, Sajid-Wajid
Lyrics: Kausar Munir, Neelesh Misra, Anvita Dutt Guptan

Ek Tha Tiger was filmed in more than 10 countries ranging from Turkey and the Czech Republic to Cuba and Hong Kong. And the music composers have tried to bring out the multi-cultural settings in the film’s soundtrack. ‘MashAllah’, inspired by Middle Eastern music, boasts of a catchy riff. But the track soon begins to tire one out with its predictable elements – the foreign language interlude and the percussion.

While ‘MashAllah’ was inspired by the Arab world, ‘Laapata’ is a salsa number reminiscent of the hits that Gloria Estafan churned out in the early ’90s, complete with the hornsection, percussion and keyboard fillers. Unlike the hooking melody lines that

Latin-pop songs usually carry, this particular number, sung by KK and Palak Muchhal, only has the chorus refrain word ‘laapata’ as its most memorable feature.

Singer Sukhwinder Singh’s resonant vocals lift up the soundtrack with ‘Banjaara’. The song’s introduction, featuring choral harmonies, comes as a breath of fresh air. The recurring violin interlude that holds together the various parts of the song is the best element in the track. With ‘Saiyaara’, singer Mohit Chauhan does what he’s best at: delivering a ballad in his signature, conspicuously emotive style of singing. This song boasts of a distinctive string section and a steady groove, which accentuate the listening experience.

In ‘Tiger’s Theme’, the distortion guitar riffs and heavy bass lines are coupled with occasional experiments with the melody, played on the oud and mandolin, which seem fitting for the suspense thriller.

Besides these five tracks, the album also features the remix versions of ‘MashAllah’, ‘Laapata’ and ‘Banjara’- all uptempo, sonically over-layered versions of the original.