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2010 was an action-packed year for literature in India

2010 was an action-packed year for literature in India with some exciting titles hitting book stands, writers achieving new heights and controversies having their share as well.

books Updated: Dec 28, 2010 13:11 IST

2010 was an action-packed year for literature in India with some exciting titles hitting book stands, writers achieving new heights and controversies having their share as well.

The year saw publishers coming out with numerous titles on genres like business, biographies and memoirs, commercial and mass market fiction, literary fiction, self help, chik-lit and culinary.

Former Lok Sabha Speaker Somnath Chatterjee was the unlikely newsmaker of the year as his memoir Keeping the Faith criticised the policies of his own party – the CPI-M – and the Left Front and recounted the events that led to his expulsion from the party.

Chatterjee also blamed CPI-M general secretary Prakash Karat's "arrogance" for the party's poll debacles in his book.

India-born Canadian writer Rohinton Mistry was also in the news after his book Such a Long Journey was withdrawn by Vice-Chancellor of Mumbai University from BA syllabus in September after Shiv Sena's student wing alleged that it contained derogatory remarks about Maharashtrians. Later in an open letter, the writer expressed "profound dismay at the expeditious decision by the university."

India's voracious writer-columnist Khushwant Singh continued his passion for writing and came out with four books during the year – The Sunset Club, City Improbable, Absolute Khushwant and Why I Supported the Emergency.

A Delhi couple falling in love while waiting for a traffic light to turn green in the capital figured in one of the several stories of celebrated British writer Jeffrey Archer's new book And Thereby Hangs a Tale that had a special India launch. The author was in India for the launch.

Daman Singh, the writer daughter of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, came out with her second novel The Sacred Grove and disclosed her plans to write a book about her parents during an interview.

India was the guest country at the 23rd Turin International Book Fair in Italy from May 13-17.

Buoyed by the success of IIM alumni Karan Bajaj's debut work Keep off the Grass, HarperCollins undertook a unique and massive marketing campaign for the first print run of an impressive 50,000 copies of his second novel, a thriller called Johnny Gone Down.

Rana Dasgupta's Solo won the Commonwealth Writers Prize, Fault Lines fetched the Goldman Sachs Award for Best Book for Raghuram Rajan and Manu Joseph's Serious Men bagged the Hindu Literary Award.

Three cookbooks by Westland Ltd, Flash in the Pan: What to Cook and How, How the Banana Goes to Heaven and Hajra's Recipes of Life, for Life were named by Gourmand as the best cookbooks from India.