What’s going on in your kid’s head? A new book helps crack the code | books$reviews | Hindustan Times
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What’s going on in your kid’s head? A new book helps crack the code

Let Him Not Sink, by Delhi-based psychiatrist Dr Samir Parikh and clinical psychologist Kamna Chhibber, explores 17 mental health conditions in the context of children.

books Updated: Nov 12, 2017 08:52 IST
Anonna Dutt
LET HIM NOT SINK
  • By Samir Parikh and Kamna Chhibber
  • Rupa Publications
  • Cost: Rs 200 (e-edition)

Amid reports of adolescents and teenagers lashing out, this book can help you spot and deal with early signs of psychological and behavioural disorders in youngsters.

Written by Delhi-based psychiatrist Dr Samir Parikh and clinical psychologist Kamna Chhibber, Let Him Not Sink starts by identifying common psychological and mental health problems that are often missed by parents and paediatricians.

It then offers a step-by-step guide to dealing with such problems — six steps, to be precise, which include identifying the child at risk, evaluating the degree of risk to self and others, listening non-judgementally and giving reassurance, informing the caregiver, encouraging help-seeking and providing information on how to do it, and building resilience after intervention.

The book also spells out red flags for different conditions.

Depression? Look for symptoms like fatigue, irritability, inability to concentrate, or anger without any trigger. Anxiety disorder? The child will show symptoms of breathlessness, express fears of going crazy or dying.

The book explores 17 mental health conditions in the context of children, including eating disorders, autism spectrum disorder and self-harm, with symptoms, risk factors, first steps for intervention, how to interact with the children, and how to guide parents and caregivers to seek professional help, for each condition.

Each section also busts a popular myth, such as the one that says depression is just an excuse for bad behaviour. The truth is, it reminds us, children often feel bad about their behaviour after the fact. It’s the adults’ job to help ensure they don’t have too much to regret.