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World Book Day: Get booked in the city

books Updated: Apr 23, 2012 10:05 IST

Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

On the World Book and Copyright Day (April 23), go on a book shopping spree

World Book and Copyright Day is celebrated worldwide on April 23 every year since 1995. UNESCO’s General Conference in 1995 chose this date to pay tribute to books, authors and promote reading, publishing and protect intellectual property through copyright.

As books face a threat from e-books, social networking and micro-blogging sites, television and movies, we ask prominent authors in the city to tell us what needs to be done to revive youngsters’ interest in reading.

We also take you on a journey through the bylanes of Old Delhi that sell second hand books, which are basically rare books, at throwaway prices. If you find it tiring to go all the way to ‘Purani Dilli’, then visit the ongoing book fairs in the city. So, step out and lose yourself in the world of books.

Revisiting old book bazaars

Nai Sarak

Mostly frequented by college students, this market is popular for second-hand school and college books that are available at half the original price. Visit Divya Prakashan Book store for second-hand fashion magazines here.

Where: Near Town Hall, Chandni Chowk; Timings: 9am to 6pm; Nearest Metro station: Chandni Chowk on the Yellow Line

Bungalow Road, Kamla Nagar

Despite the limited collection here, you can easily find books by popular authors such as Danielle Steel, Sydney Sheldon or Paulo Coelho for Rs. 80 to Rs. 150. This market also offers a great option to get a good return on old books you’ve wanted to sell off since long.

Where: Kamla Nagar

Timings: 10.30am to 9pm

Nearest Metro station: Vishvidyalaya on the Yellow Line

Sunday Bazaar, Daryaganj

Over 200 booksellers put up their stalls on the streets of the Old Delhi market every Sunday. From rare titles to encyclopedias and regional literature to historical chronicles, you name it and you will find it here at throwaway prices (R10-R200). Where: Main Daryaganj Market; Timings: 9am to 5pm; Nearest Metro station: Chawri Bazar on the Yellow Line

(Vaishali Bhambri)

Other ongoing book fairs

The on-going Gurgaon book fair at Fortis Memorial Research Institute includes a host of reading sessions, author interactions and a wide array of books at special discounts. Organised by the National Book Trust, the fair has stalls put up by 50 leading Indian and international publishing houses. While the NBT stall sells interesting biographies and folklore in English and Hindi for R15 onwards, you can also go for the Hachette ‘Learn series’, which has books on how to speak different languages like German and Spanish, or playing the guitar, priced between R250 to R700. The popular vampire series, Kathputlee Chitrakatha, gives classic fairytales a new dimension with its 3D books and glasses for R299. There are also interesting mind games like Jai Bharat and World Safari for R300 to R500 by Creative Educational Aids. Most stalls will have special discounts on the World Book Day tomorrow.

The National Book Trust (NBT), on the occasion of World Book and Copyright Day, is holding a book fair and national seminar on children’s literature in collaboration with Lekhika Sangh at National Bal Bhawan, New Delhi from April 20-23.

(Chetna Dua)

Authors speak

Reading is cooler than watching movies

Anuja Chauhan

Make reading ‘cool’. People who have actually read the Harry Potter books are so much cooler than the drones who have only seen the movies based on the books. Youngsters should visit bookstores. There are lovely bookstores nowadays in the city, and covers have become really yummy as well. But, books are losing out to television shows and video games. Maybe the answer is to go camping without the internet. I say, take a book to read on the flight — you will be able to read it right through.

Youngsters should be encouraged to write

Anuradha Roy

We should surround youngsters with books. We should read to them when they are young and make them read when they are grown up. They should also be encouraged to write and this will brainwash them into thinking that they cannot do without books. Look around in trains, the Metro and airplanes — how many people do you actually see reading any book at all? Printed books are not losing out to e-books. They are losing out to phones and the internet.

It’S important for parents to instill reading habits in kids

Madhulika Liddle

The biggest influence are parents. If parents spend all their time in front of the TV or surfing the internet, children are likely to think that is the way to go. It’s important for parents to encourage their kids to explore books. e-books are books. They’re pretty useful for everybody in many ways and helping save paper (and trees!). Internet is a different story. That, and TV, are a major threat to books. What is important is that we should teach children to like books, and chances are that they’ll continue to like them despite other attractions.

E Books are inevitable and effective in the long run

SV Divvaakar

I think youngsters are naturally interested in reading. But in recent times, they haven’t been reading much, because of a lot of visual media being consumed, with short attention spans. Books are transforming with technology, not losing out. The net, kindle and e-books are inevitable, and, if you ask me, more effective and environment friendly in the long run. Digital media will bring costs down, take content faster to people and do away with the old format retail of the mom and pop store.

(Aakriti Sawhney0

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