The Brunch pop-culture round-up (Part 1)

  • Team Brunch, Hindustan Times
  • Updated: May 24, 2015 12:59 IST

The Brunch team likes to think of itself as a small flock of cultured vultures. When we’re not out scavenging for stories, we stock up on pop culture. So here are our recommendations.

The Passage by Justin Cronin
– Poonam Saxena
Part one of a trilogy. Genre fiction of the kind I love. A US Army experiment goes wrong and creates terrifying vampires, which devastate the world and kill everyone. Well, almost everyone. There are pockets of survivors who have to still deal with the bloodsucking creatures – and each other. When literary writer Cronin tried his hand at dystopian horror/sci-fi, not only did he become a millionaire many times over, he also wrote a gripping page-turner. Can’t wait to start the sequel, The Twelve.

Poonam is the Big Boss. It’s not done till she says it’s done. And change that headline. Following

– Nihit Bhave

The serial-killer-thriller TV series’s awesomeness can be best described through a Sex & The City reference: Remember Miranda’s obsession with a cake she bakes? She eats it; puts it in the fridge; takes it out; eats it; puts it in the fridge; can’t sleep so wakes up and eats it; throws it in the trash; takes it out and eats it? The Following is like that cake. And it has Bacon. Kevin Bacon.

Nihit is also a little bit like that cake, which is to say he has quite a following

Granta 130: New Indian Writing
– Aasheesh Sharma
The India special issue edited by Ian Jack (who also edited their anthology on Indian writing in 1997 on the golden jubilee of Independence) features some impressive fiction, non-fiction and poetry. The pieces that I enjoyed reading the most: Aman Sethi’s reportage-based essay on the Love Commandos, an extract from a Neel Mukherjee novel. And Upamanyu Chatterjee’s droll take on our obsession with Shakespeare.

Aasheesh is super at editing copy. He can cut 3,000 words down to 750, and you won’t even notice. episodes of SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron

– Asad Ali

Oh, the time when good vs evil badassery on Cartoon Network was all you looked forward to! Remember the two slick felines of Megakat city (T-Bone and Razor) who flew the super cool Turbokat - that was like a GI Joe plane, but on steroids with guns coming out of everywhere? They are vigilante type pilots out to save Megakat city from all evil. YouTube to jog your memory.

Asad is usually very highbrow. But then again, which Bengali isn’t?

BBC’s Wolf Hall
– Monica Gupta
This new period drama series is based on the book by Hilary Mantel. It’s set in the reign of King Henry VIII of England and follows the events and people, especially Thomas Cromwell, who helped Henry annul his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon. There is sex, beheading and politics that makes the king seem like a puppet. What more can you ask for?

Monica is going to judge you if you don’t watch something she has recommended.’s Anatomy

– Aastha Atray Banan

Yes. Judge me. After the whole hoo-ha on Twitter about McDreamy dying, the romantic in me wanted to figure out what was his charm exactly. So I started watching him woo Meredith, fall in love with her, then try to do the right thing and stay with his wife, and then come back to Meredith. Oh Derek, I love that you try. And you look so good doing it. That hair! So yes, judge me. But I am having fun.

Aastha is also a romance author. Need we say more?

CokeStudio Season 4
– Atisha Jain

I’m HOOKED to Tochi Raina and Jasmine Sandlas’s powerful voices in Bannado and Saawan Mein, composed by Sachin Jigar. I’m so, so entranced by their beautiful fusion of Indian and western beats – and the coming together of jazz, rock and pop with a good amount of dhol thrown in.

Atisha is the baby of the Brunch family – until a younger version joins us!

From HT Brunch, May 24
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