Why prime-time TV is turning into crime-time TV | brunch$boc | Hindustan Times
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Why prime-time TV is turning into crime-time TV

Drumroll for the six shows which make us suspect lurking murderers in every neighbour, watchman or monkey.

brunch Updated: Nov 29, 2015 11:46 IST
Zehra Kazmi
Crime Patrol

You can’t take your eyes off salacious crimes on television. And we get to pretend that we are becoming ‘satark’ and ‘savdhan’ in the bargain. Drumroll for the six shows which make us suspect lurking murderers in every neighbour, watchman or monkey:

Crime Patrol: When it began in 2003, its dramatisation of real-life crimes stood out among the saas-bahus. Plus, it was anchored by daily soap staples: first, Anup Soni and later, Sakshi Tanwar.

Savdhaan India – India Fights Back: Hosted by Sushant Singh, this beats the pants off every saas-bahu show: there are crimes of passion, extra-marital affairs, and even an episode where the victim’s sister pretends to be a naagin to spook her in-laws. The show decided, if CSI could have CSI: Miami, then Uttar Pradesh (with its plentiful crime) deserves its own Savdhaan – UP Fights Back.

Shaitaan – A Criminal Mind: As the name suggests, it tried to delve into the minds of killers and rapists to draw psychological portraits. Shaitaan wound up, but its host Sharad Kelkar now plays the clue-sniffing, Sherlock-esque detective in the new crime drama, Agent Raghav – Crime Branch.

Code Red: Anchored by Sakshi Tanwar, its main focus is crimes against women and children and grim suicides, but it occasionally branches into Aahat territory, with stories of haunted villages and ghosts.

Gumrah - End of Innocence: A teen version of other crime dramas, with teens killing and stealing with impunity. It is painful to watch anchor Karan Patel’s grave, giving-up-on-humanity face as he delivers homilies.

MTV Webbed: About the big bad world of cyber crime. Stories of online stalking, leaked photos and bullying serve as warnings to viewers, but also coach them on how to avoid falling prey to these crimes.

From HT Brunch, October 18

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