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With no regrets

While most ‘artistes’ decide to ditch reasoning altogether to pursue their love for the art, Sandeep Kapoor, 40, has an entirely different story to tell. “Now, at the age of 40 if I move to Mumbai, I won’t be getting any lead roles in Bollywood for sure. But, when I turn 50, at least I wouldn’t regret not having pursued my passion for acting.”

brunch Updated: Mar 10, 2013 09:27 IST
Usmeet Kaur

While most ‘artistes’ decide to ditch reasoning altogether to pursue their love for the art, Sandeep Kapoor, 40, has an entirely different story to tell. “Now, at the age of 40 if I move to Mumbai, I won’t be getting any lead roles in Bollywood for sure. But, when I turn 50, at least I wouldn’t regret not having pursued my passion for acting.”


Born and brought up in Chandigarh, Sandeep is presently working as a general manager at PAC Asia Services. As a youngster though, love trumped acting for Sandeep, as he shares, “I loved a girl named Archana, who is my wife now. We were in a relationship for about eight years, when one day she expressed that her father had started looking for a groom for her. At the time, I had just reached Delhi to work for Home TV [was working there as an assistant production controller.

So, the very next day, I packed up and left. Had I continued in media or the film industry then, it would have taken time for me to settle down. I also believed that one could follow their dreams at any age. If I lost the love of my life, she would’ve been gone forever.”

So, after quitting the job in Delhi, Sandeep worked as a sales executive for a minimal amount of R2,000. “For Archana’s parents, salary was not a criterion, my stability was. So, to run the marriage and to bring up my children, I have been a part of the corporate world,” shares he.

“Then, at the age of 36, I happened to meet Nabh Kumar ‘Raju’ [Mumbai-based producer-director] while travelling to Delhi in a train. After one-and-a-half months of the train journey, I got a call from him, and he ended up scripting my first documentary — Therefore I Win. He also helped me throw light on the NGO, Hamari Kaksha, to sensitise people on the Right to Education. It was after this documentary (2011) that I took a one-month course at the New York Film Academy in Mumbai,” says Sandeep.

Sandeep has also directed a song for Nabh Kumar’s forthcoming film, Nabbeyy, and has assisted Nabh in its direction, story and screenplay.

About his upcoming role of a CBI officer in Punjabi film Saada Haq, which releases on April 5, Sandeep says, “When I signed the film with Kuljinder Sidhu, I faced a lot of criticism, as the subject seemed controversial. But then I thought, if films such as Maachis and Chakravyuh can be received well, why not Saada Haq?”

Sandeep, with his eight-year-old son Viraj (as Kevin) would also be seen in Hollywood movie Dreamz, which is being directed by Suman Mukherjee.

Sandeep has a few more projects in hand. “On DD, I would be seen in a serial called Mandakini, and would be part of Nabh Kumar’s upcoming Hindi and Punjabi feature film,” he concludes.