BharatBerry is here: India’s homegrown answer to BlackBerry | business | Hindustan Times
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BharatBerry is here: India’s homegrown answer to BlackBerry

If BlackBerry creates problems for corporate e-mail users on the move because it cannot comply with the security monitoring norms of the government, a homegrown firm is ready to offer a similar service with that problem removed. Sanjeev K Ahuja reports.

business Updated: Oct 05, 2010 02:22 IST
Sanjeev K Ahuja

If BlackBerry creates problems for corporate e-mail users on the move because it cannot comply with the security monitoring norms of the government, a homegrown firm is ready to offer a similar service with that problem removed.
Welcome to BharatBerry!

Dubbed as “an India compliant end-to-end service” this venture started by Ajay Data,36, from Rajasthan says a BharatBerry service (in which handsets are not made by the firm) aims to address one million BlackBerry users as a market should Research In Motion fails to comply with government requirements that it must allow interventions to help law enforcers trying to check abuse of confidential corporate mail by terror groups.

“It is an alternative for the existing and potential BlackBerry handset users who are worried about the disruption of this service,” Data told Hindustan Times.

A PhD from Netherlands, Data says his firm, Jaipur-based Data Infosys Ltd, offers calendar, contact management and other value-addition through its e-mail server, XGeN Plus and compatible open-source technologies.

It might not be quite the thing for multinationals with a global footprint,but the affordability makes it quite Indian as it is available for monthly fee that is a fraction of base-level BlackBerry offers.

“We have tested the service thoroughly on all BlackBerry models and it works well with all of them. It is a completely secure, fully tested, and totally reliable service for as low as R250 a month,”Data said.

Data Infosys offers BlackBerry-like security, akin to corporate IT systems, but over a larger network.

“The data stored on our server is encrypted and behind a firewall,” Data said.

“Before we encrypt and send the email to users’ handsets, the BharatBerry server can give monitoring capability on any user the government desires.”

This contrasts BlackBerry approach, which offers a secure encryption but does not offer any interface for other agencies. In fact, RIM says it has no window of its own to the data it encrypts.

Company officials said BharatBerry follows a 128-bit encryption, considered a high industry standard. BlackBerry has a proprietary encryption with its own technological secret sauce.

Data said his technology platform is already being used by the Reserve Bank of India and Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd.