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'China more complex for business than India'

India is much more logical with booming new businesses and a growing middle class, says Danielle Duran.

business Updated: Mar 28, 2007 09:22 IST

With a growing middle class and increasing propensity to spend on goods and services, India offers a more conducive market than China, says Danielle Duran, international trade coordinator for New Mexico state in the United States.

"China looks like a complex economy to tackle and they are very large. India is much more logical with booming new businesses and a growing middle class," Duran, who is on an 11-day visit to India, told the agency.

Duran is heading a delegation of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) from the US to push bilateral trade and investment under the aegis of the US-India Political Action Committee (USINPAC), a political advocacy group for the Indian American community.

According to Duran, whose delegation comprises five members representing areas like aviation and technology, SMEs in India are growing like never before with a more aggressive outlook and competitive edge than other emerging economies in Asia.

"The SME scene here is very exciting. People are good at business and realistic about the marketplace," she said, adding that her delegation will explore investment opportunities in India.

"We are also looking at faculty exchange options as we are also promoting New Mexico as a preferred destination for higher studies," Duran said.

These measures, according to her, will help in creating a longer relationship with India.

During her visit, Duran met senior government officials in the directorate general of civil aviation, department of biotechnology and as representatives of some big IT companies such as Tata Consultancy, Wipro and HCL.

The delegation will also visit cities like Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai to explore the possibilities of promoting SME trade in diverse fields.

"We are also speaking with the Film Producers Guild of India for choosing New Mexico for shooting films there," said Duran, who has previously worked in Japan, Israel, Germany and Britain.

According to her, four-five SMEs in optics and water-related technologies from New Mexico will visit India soon to study the Indian market. Some companies are also eyeing at investing in India's special economic zones, she added.