Corporate India votes for men on top | business | Hindustan Times
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Corporate India votes for men on top

Most of corporate India would like a man on top, says a new broad-based survey. What’s perhaps surprising is that two-thirds of those who returned the verdict were women executives.

business Updated: May 14, 2008 02:39 IST
HT Correspondent

Most of corporate India would like a man on top, says a new broad-based survey. What’s perhaps surprising is that two-thirds of those who returned the verdict were women executives. But here’s the paradox: an overwhelming majority of the women polled also said there was a glass ceiling in place hindering their own lot’s rise up the corporate ladder. More women also said that they would prefer men as co-workers.

The findings came from a ‘random survey’ of 2,500 executives from the cities of Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Bangalore and Hyderabad conducted recently by industry association Assocham. These included 1300 men and 1200 women executives.

Operational freedom at work, good leadership and objective reasoning ability were among the most important factors by which these executives seemingly defined a ‘good boss’.

At a time ‘emotional quotient’ of the leader is considered a valued trait, more than two-thirds of those who voted for men in the survey said women were ‘more emotional’ and were, more often than not, torn between the job and motherhood. The rest, for whom gender didn’t matter, said they would head for the exit door if the boss were ‘harsh’.

Two out of five men polled said men were better leaders, and one in three women agreed. The preference for female bosses declined as the age of the respondent went up.

More than half the women polled felt they had been discriminated on the basis of gender and 45 per cent of them also agreed with the statement: “Women have to work twice as hard to prove themselves, and then even when they are on the same level as men they still get discriminated against by getting lower salaries than their male counterparts.”