‘Each of our brands is strong enough to sustain a campaign on its own’ | business | Hindustan Times
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‘Each of our brands is strong enough to sustain a campaign on its own’

Nadia Chauhan, the 22-year-old director of Parle Agro, speaks with Radhika Pancholi on how the company is focused on increasing the brand identity of each of their verticals:

business Updated: Nov 17, 2008 21:25 IST
Radhika Pancholi

Parle Agro is best known for its beverages. Whether it was introducing soft drink brands like Thums Up, Gold Spot and Limca (which were later taken over by Coca-Cola) or packaged drinks like Frooti and Appy to the Indian market, the company with a turnover of Rs 950 crore has over the years expanded to two more verticals — confectionary and packaged drinking water. Nadia Chauhan, the 22-year-old director of Parle Agro, speaks with

Radhika Pancholi

on how the company is focused on increasing the brand identity of each of their verticals:

What is your vision for the beverage vertical?
With the launch of Saint, we have entered the juice category too. This is one segment that will provide huge opportunities in the future. We have 10 beverage factories and this segment contributes 80 per cent to our turnover. So our vision is definitely to be known as a beverage company that is present in each and every beverage category in the future.

Though Saint was launched over a month back, why has the rollout been so slow?
We have been highly selective about Saint’s distribution. It’s a very high-end product and one of the most expensive juice brands in the market. We wanted to maintain its exclusivity and decided to stick only to metros and mini-metros for its distribution. With the launch of Saint, we have also discovered a whole new market—the hospitality industry.

Competition in the packaged drinking water segment has also got tougher. How do you plan to distinguish Bailley from the rest?
The packaged water market is increasingly shifting from being a commodity to a brand driven market. In fact, this Rs 1,500 crore market is set to provide us with huge opportunities and making Bailley a strong brand identity would feature high on our list. We have started working on it by increasing our manufacturing capacity from the current 26 factories to 60 by the end of 2009.

The advertising campaign for Mintrox started off with a bang, but we haven’t seen much on that front in recent times. Was this a conscious decision?
Volumes are important in the confectionary business and once we established the brand identities for Mintrox and Butter Cups, we went on to the next stage of concentrating on distributing these products across India and the response on-ground has been very encouraging.

Unlike your competitors we haven’t seen a campaign that puts all your brands together. Why?
Each of our brands is strong enough to sustain a campaign on their own and a different brand value and therefore I can’t imagine a common media campaign for all of them.

How do you plan to take forward already evolved brands such as Frooti and Appy?
When we repackaged Frooti a few years back we were a little sceptical on whether the move would work. We were pleasantly surprised to see the response we got from consumers who began identifying with the drink even more. This encouraged us to experiment with Appy’s packaging too and the risk we took with the black colour packaging paid off and has only made the brand stronger. For Appy Fizz, which is our answer to the sparkling juice category, our advertising campaign promoting it as a fun drink has paid off.