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We’re sorry, says Facebook

Popular social networking platform Facebook has tendered an apology to its users for creating confusion over the privacy of their content, reports Ruchi Hajela.

business Updated: Feb 21, 2009 16:14 IST
Ruchi Hajela

Popular social networking platform Facebook has tendered an apology to its users for creating confusion over the privacy of their content.

Users who may try to deactivate their account on the site are now being asked if they are doing so because of concern for their content.

“Are you deactivating because you are concerned about Facebook's Terms of Service?” the site asks when a user tries to deactivate his/her account. “This was a mistake that we have now corrected. You own the information you put on Facebook and you control what happens to it. We are sorry for the confusion,” states the message posted by the Facebook team.

The message also lists the link to a blog entry posted by Facebook founder and chief executive officer Mark Zuckerberg on February 18 that mentions that the networking platform would continue with its previous ‘terms of service’ till new terms are defined.

Interestingly, the Facebook team is also asking users to contribute ideas and suggestions on the language of the new 'terms', and has set up a global group called 'Facebook Bill of Rights and Responsibilities' where users can leave comments.

"If you'd like to get involved in crafting our new terms, you can start posting your questions, comments and requests in the group we've created—Facebook Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. I'm looking forward to reading your input," Zuckerberg wrote on his blog.

The group already has over 78,000 members and over 9,000 'Wall Posts' or entries have been put up from February 18 till the time of writing this article.

Suspicion over privacy of users' content uploaded on Facebook was raised recently after the company changed the language in its 'Terms of Service' on February 4, stating that even after users leave Facebook, others would be able to access their information and content like photos and messages.

Zuckerberg in his blog entry posted on February 16 clarified that the intention was to just make it clear that even after a user has deleted his account, the messages he may have sent out to his contacts would continue to be with recipients.