1st-prize entry by former art college head was copied from net, says PGI | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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1st-prize entry by former art college head was copied from net, says PGI

A day after the poster-making competition held to mark the World Organ Donation Day at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, ran into controversy for awarding the first prize to a computer-made entry, it has now emerged that the creation itself was copied from the internet.

chandigarh Updated: Aug 08, 2014 11:12 IST
HT Correspondent

A day after the poster-making competition held to mark the World Organ Donation Day at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, ran into controversy for awarding the first prize to a computer-made entry, it has now emerged that the creation itself was copied from the internet.

The prize has now been scrapped, even as the poster was made by former principal of Government College of Art, Sector 10, DS Kapoor.

A press release by the PGI said that a committee reviewed the posters that were awarded the first three prizes and the special merit prizes.

“After looking at the corresponding images available on the internet, the committee observed that concept of the poster that got the first prize (poster number 39, by professor DS Kapoor) has been copied,” the release added.

It was also mentioned that the poster does not meet the conditions of the competition. Professor Kapoor’s poster has been scrapped and institute has updated the order of the merit of award after the exclusion of first prize.

Even otherwise, as reported by HT on Thursday, the entry of Kapoor was not eligible for entry as it was machine-made, while the conditions for the contests stated that only hand-made posters were allowed.

A group of eminent personalities, including city-based art critic BN Goswamy, sculptor Shiv Singh and principal of Government College of Art, Sector 10, were the judges.